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This small SQL error is bugging me. It doesn't seem to be a problem with the query, just the scope(?), examples work best:

SELECT ocp.*, oc.*, GROUP_CONCAT( u.username SEPARATOR ', ') AS `memjoined`
FROM gangs_ocs_process ocp, gangs_ocs oc
LEFT JOIN users u ON u.userid IN ( ocp.membersin )
WHERE ocp.ocid =1 AND ocp.gangid =1 AND oc.oc_name = ocp.crimename
GROUP BY ocp.ocid
LIMIT 0 , 30

Theres a column (gangs_ocs_process.membersin) which has a list of IDs that have joined (ie 1,2,5). I'm trying to get the usernames for each of these IDs (from the users table) in one go.

The problem is LEFT JOIN users u ON u.userid IN ( ocp.membersin )

If I substitue 1,2,4 in for ocp.membersin (putting the literal list instead of column name), it works ok. It returns a column that has the usernames (image). However, if I leave in the ocp.membersin, I get this error:

#1054 - Unknown column 'ocp.membersin' in 'on clause'

This is the first time I've even used IN in left joins so I'm a bit lost.

Any help would be great :)

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sorry for the 1 million edits. Can you elaborate the relation between gangs_ocs_process, gangs_oc, and users. –  cmsjr Feb 20 '09 at 13:54
    
It's ok. The relation doesn't matter much since it returns the column as a string, which won't work properly with the IN which needs just a list of values. Most of the edits you made did work, but we both seemed to miss this point until Jeremy there pointed it out –  damnitshot Feb 20 '09 at 14:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think that "IN" will work for this syntax. MySQL expects IN to be something akin to a dataset, not a delimited string. I think you need to find a way to take membersin, expand it into a dataset MySQL can work with (maybe a temporary table), and join on that.

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Yes - I'm pretty sure that's it now. The column has 1,2,3, but turns it into userid IN ('1,2,3'), which only fetches one. I'll have to expand/use two queries –  damnitshot Feb 20 '09 at 13:54

If you have delimited strings in your table, you have a design problem in your database. Add a new table to hold these values.

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Are you sure 'membersin' is in the 'gangs_ocs_process' table, and not the 'gangs_ocs' table?

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Made me double check heh, but yes it is. –  damnitshot Feb 20 '09 at 13:19

The reason you can't get it to work is because first you need to get your database NORMALIZED. You should NEVER, EVER have a list of ID's in a single column.

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I'm using (trying) IN because the membersin col has multiple values, and I'm getting multiple rows back from the users table (grouping them with GROUP_CONCAT()). I tried your method as well, but it still says unknown column. –  damnitshot Feb 20 '09 at 13:13
    
Ok, then your problem is simple - your database is DENORMALIZED and that is the source of your problems. –  Otávio Décio Feb 20 '09 at 13:17

After taking another look, I think your problem is trying to aggregate at the wrong point as well as the IN syntax and that you should aggregate in a subquery restricted by the contents of the IN. I don't know enough about your schema to make this out of the box correct, but you want something like this. SomeKeyfield should relate back to gangs_ocs_process

SELECT ocp.*, oc.*, u.Memjoined
FROM gangs_ocs_process ocp, gangs_ocs oc
LEFT JOIN (Select SomeKeyField, GROUP_CONCAT( u.username SEPARATOR ', ') as memjoined
    		from  users where userid in
    		(select membersin from gangs_ocs_process 
             where [whatever conditions] )
             Group By SomeKeyField) u on ocp.SomeKeyField = u.SomeKeyField

WHERE ocp.ocid =1 AND ocp.gangid =1 AND oc.oc_name = ocp.crimename
GROUP BY ocp.ocid
LIMIT 0 , 30
share|improve this answer

This is a bad way to keep membership.

But if you still need to live with it, you may try REGEXP matching to test for membership:

SELECT ocp.*, oc.*, GROUP_CONCAT( u.username SEPARATOR ', ') AS `memjoined`
FROM gangs_ocs_process ocp
LEFT JOIN users u ON (ocp.membersin RLIKE CONCAT('(^|,)[[:blank:]]?', userid, '[[:blank:]]?($|,)'))
JOIN gangs_ocs oc ON (ocp.ocid = 1 AND ocp.gangid = 1 AND oc.oc_name = ocp.crimename)
GROUP BY ocp.ocid
LIMIT 0 , 30
share|improve this answer
    
It seems to partly work, I moved it back to two joins like you posted. The error doesn't come up, however, even though the membersin column is '1,2,3', it only returns one users row (I used the same IN() syntax as above) –  damnitshot Feb 20 '09 at 13:30
    
See updated post. –  Quassnoi Feb 20 '09 at 14:25

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