Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The code

private SomeClass<Integer> someClass;
someClass = EasyMock.createMock(SomeClass.class);

gives me a warning "Type safety: The expression of type SomeClass needs unchecked conversion to conform to SomeClass<Integer>".

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

AFAIK, you can't avoid the unchecked warning when a class name literal is involved, and the SuppressWarnings annotation is the only way to handle this.

Note that it is good form to narrow the scope of the SuppressWarnings annotation as much as possible. You can apply this annotation to a single local variable assignment:

public void testSomething() {

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    Foo<Integer> foo = EasyMock.createMock(Foo.class);

    // Rest of test method may still expose other warnings
}

or use a helper method:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
private static <T> Foo<T> createFooMock() {
    return (Foo<T>)EasyMock.createMock(Foo.class);
}

public void testSomething() {
    Foo<String> foo = createFooMock();

    // Rest of test method may still expose other warnings
}
share|improve this answer

I worked around this problem by introducing a subclass, e.g.

private abstract class MySpecialString implements MySpecial<String>{};

Then create a mock of that abstract class:

MySpecial<String> myMock = createControl().createMock(MySpecialString.class);
share|improve this answer
    
Additionally, don't forget to use the org.easymock.classextension.EasyMock version of EasyMock to create your mocks when using the abstract class. –  Andreas Oct 17 '12 at 14:41

The two obvious routes are to suppress the warning or mock a subclass.

private static class SomeClass_Integer extends SomeClass<Integer>();
private SomeClass<Integer> someClass;
...
    someClass = EasyMock.createMock(SomeClass_Integer.class);

(Disclaimer: Not even attempted to compile this code, nor have I used EasyMock.)

share|improve this answer
    
The syntax should probably be: private static interface SomeClass_Integer extends SomeClass<Integer> {} I have the same problem and this is the work around I use so the approach will work. But I hope somebody has the answer we are looking for –  bmatthews68 Sep 11 '08 at 16:14

You can annotate the test method with @SuppressWarnings("unchecked"). I agree this is some what of a hack but in my opinion it's acceptable on test code.

@Test
@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public void someTest() {
    SomeClass<Integer> someClass = EasyMock.createMock(SomeClass.class);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
yeah, but that leaves me feeling cheap –  Kevin Wong Sep 12 '08 at 14:34
2  
If you go this route (hopefully there is a better way), much better to put the @SuppressWarnings on the variable assignment rather than the whole method. –  SamBeran Dec 29 '08 at 4:04

I know this goes against the question, but why not create a List rather than a Mock List?

It's less code and easier to work with, for instance if you want to add items to the list.

MyItem myItem = createMock(myItem.class);
List<MyItem> myItemList = new ArrayList<MyItem>();
myItemList.add(myItem);

Instead of

MyItem myItem = createMock(myItem.class);
@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
List<MyItem> myItemList = createMock(ArrayList.class);
expect(myItemList.get(0)).andReturn(myItem);
replay(myItemList);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.