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I'm trying what seems like a very simple task: use bash to search a file for strings, and if they exist, output those to another file. It could be jetlag, but this should work:

#!/bin/bash

cnty=CNTRY

for line in $(cat wheatvrice.csv); do
    if [[ $line = *$cnty* ]]
    then
        echo $line >> wr_imp.csv
    fi
done

I also tried this for completeness:

#!/bin/bash

cnty=CNTRY

for line in $(cat wheatvrice.csv); do
    case $line in 
    *"$cnty"*) echo $line >> wr_imp.csv;;
    *) echo "no";;
    esac
done

both output everything, regardless of whether the line contains CNTRY or not, and I'm copy/pasting from seemingly reliable sources, so apparently there's something simple about bash-ness that I'm missing?

share|improve this question
    
for what it's worth, some lines are: <br>Brazil,CNTRY-average,1989.428053,0.875353691,2899.968733,531.652993 <br> these are the ones i want, and others are <br> Cambodia,Pouthisat,,,3857.124865,122.266868 <br> and these are not the ones I want –  Joshua Noble Apr 17 '11 at 20:00
    
definitely jetlag. use grep –  sehe Apr 17 '11 at 20:24
    
jetlag's a mean bitch :) –  pepoluan Apr 18 '11 at 1:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Don't use bash, use grep.

grep -F "$cnty" wheatvrice.csv >> wr_imp.csv
share|improve this answer
    
perhaps I'm missing something but that seems to have the same effect both w/in the bash script and just directly in the terminal. –  Joshua Noble Apr 17 '11 at 20:01
1  
​.​.​.​ What​?​ –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 17 '11 at 20:05
    
using grep -F "$cnty" wheatvrice.csv >> wr_imp.csv simply puts every line from wheatvrice.csv into wr_imp.csv –  Joshua Noble Apr 17 '11 at 20:09
1  
He sets it to CNTRY, maybe you should just use that explicitly. –  Neil Apr 17 '11 at 20:14
1  
Im' really sorry, this is just me being sleepy & having Excel (aka my least favorite program ever) put the wrong line endings on. Upvoted & thanks. –  Joshua Noble Apr 17 '11 at 20:42

While I would suggest to simply use grep too, the question is open, why you approach didn't work. Here a self referential modification of your second approach - with keyword 'bash' to match itself:

#!/bin/bash

cnty=bash    
while read -r line
do
    case $line in 
        *${cnty}*) 
            echo $line " yes" >> bashgrep.log
            ;;
        *)
                echo "no"
                ;;
    esac
done < bashgrep.sh

The keypoint is while read -r line ... < FILE. Your command with cat involves String splitting, so every single word is processed in the loop, not every line.

The same problem in example 1.

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