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suppose I have an object like this:

class Spline {
public:
    Spline(std::size_t const dim);
    // Quite a few functions here. One of those:
    vec operator()(double const t) const; // Returns vector of dimension d
}

Now, at most uses of this class, the dimension will already be determined at compile time, thus it would be a good idea (for performance reasons) to change the class like this:

template <std::size_t dim>
class Spline {
public:
    Spline();
    // Quite a few functions here. One of those:
    vec::fixed<dim> operator()(double const t) const; // Returns vector of dimension d
}

(For those who wonder, vec and vec::fixed are objects defined by the armadillo linear algebra library). Now I would like to have both versions living in parallel, thus being able to choose the dimension at compile time as well as during runtime. In short, I would like to create the equivalent of vec::fixed<dim> as Spline::fixed<dim>, but without implementing all functions twice. Especially, I would have to choose the return type of all those functions depending on whether there is a template argument present or not.

Do you have any idea how I might accomplish this, especially thinking in terms of a clear and maintainable design? (In the hope that I made myself clear, which I am not totally sure about.)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use a simple traits metastruct and specialize that.

template<std::size_t dim>
struct spline_return_traits{
  typedef vec::fixed<dim> type;
};

template<>
struct spline_return_traits<0>{ // 0 is a special marker for runtime dimensions
  typedef vec type;
};

template<std::size_t dim>
class Spline_impl{
  typedef typename spline_return_traits<dim>::type spline_return;
public:
  spline_return operator()(double const t) const;
// if <dim> is 0, then the dynamic vec will be chosen as the return type
  // all your functions
};

class Spline : public Spline_impl<0>{ // default is dynamic
public:
  template<int dim>
  struct fixed : public Spline_impl<dim>{
  };
};

Now you simple use that. :) Every operator, constructor and function of Spline_impl should be available in the subclasses. For the implementation of each function, you need to do some branching where it's a must to decide between runtime or fixed vec:

if(dim == 0){
  // runtime specific stuff
}else{
  // compile-time specific stuff
}

Use as:

Spline dynamic_spline;
Spline::fixed<10> fixed_10_spline;

Only problem being that the Spline class will be double the size of Spline_impl... :/ Lemme think if I can find a solution to that too.
Edit: If you don't want Spline to be double the size of Spline_impl, one possibility is to add a little verbosity and a typedef:

class Spline : public Spline_impl<0>{ // default is dynamic size
public:
  template<std::size_t dim>
  struct fixed{
    typedef Spline_impl<dim> type;
  };
};

And use as

Spline dynamic_spline;
typename Spline::fixed<10>::type fixed_10_spline;
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Shouldn't that be typename Spline::fixed<10>::type fixed_10_spline;? –  larsmans Apr 18 '11 at 5:03
    
Thank you. I learn something new every day - this time you made it happen ;) –  Thilo Apr 18 '11 at 8:01

If I understand your question correctly, you want a struct for compile time usage and runtime usage as well with preferably same name. In my opinion, you can declare the class as template and then specialize one of its instance (say size_t = 0xffffffff), which you may not be using. You can declare all your definitions for runtime usage in that instance.

For example,

template<std::size_t dim = ~0> // choose default dimension(0xffffffff) not to be used
class Spline {
public:
  Spline () {}
  vec::fixed<dim> operator () (double const t) const {}
};
template<>
class Spline<~0> {  // specialize the default dimension for runtime use
public:
  Spline (std::size_t const dim) {}
  vec operator () (double const t) const {}
};

It can be used as below:

Spline<5> o5;  // compile time dimensions
Spline<> o0(3); // run time dimensions (don't mention anything in template)
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You can just overload it. Making a non-duplicate implementation, however, is a problem with no generic solution, unless you have more template magic that can do this.

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1  
Is it possible to overload on return type? –  Rafał Dowgird Apr 17 '11 at 20:53

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