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I have a function generate_username that generates a username (obviously).

The values fname and lname are mandatory, so no issues there. However, mname is NOT a mandatory field so, it may be blank, which breaks this code.

Any suggestions on how to ask ruby to only print the mname value if it exists or is set and ignore it if the user left it blank?

def generate_username
  self.username = fname.to_s.split("")[0] + mname.to_s.split("")[0] + lname.to_s
end
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1  
why are you splitting then taking the first element, why not just do a strip or gsub if you are trying to do something –  Paul Kaplan Apr 17 '11 at 20:50
    
I'm new to ruby so I'm not sure of the best techniques to grab the first letter of a string, but I'll look these up thanks :) –  stewart715 Apr 17 '11 at 20:55
    
You are a member for two months, asked 10 questions, and so far accepted none of them. I should have noticed that before I answered it. Then, I wouldn't have answered. –  sawa Apr 19 '11 at 0:55
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could try this (parentheses are important):

def generate_username
  self.username = fname.to_s.split("")[0] << (mname.to_s.split("")[0] || "") << lname.to_s
end
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Hm, this seems sound to me, but I'm getting a can't find '+' function. Thanks, though (for putting up with my newb question) –  stewart715 Apr 17 '11 at 21:00
    
Did you put the parentheses? (in case the error was: NoMethodError: undefined method `+' for false:FalseClass) –  Amokrane Chentir Apr 17 '11 at 21:01
    
Helped a bit but still getting can't convert nil into String –  stewart715 Apr 17 '11 at 21:03
    
Indeed it returns nil, didn't see this coming. Bear with me a moment :) I am coming back. –  Amokrane Chentir Apr 17 '11 at 21:12
    
There you go :) –  Amokrane Chentir Apr 17 '11 at 21:18
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Throwing a simple ternary operator in to check if the value is blank? should do the trick.

def generate_username
  self.username = fname.to_s.split("")[0] + (mname.blank? ? "" : mname.to_s.split("")[0]) + lname.to_s
end
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In ruby 1.9

def generate_username
  "#{fname[0]}#{mname.to_s[0]}#{lname}"
end

or

def generate_username
  fname[0]+mname.to_s[0].to_s+lname
end

In ruby 1.8, replace all the [0] with [0, 1] (This point added after being pointed out by Peter).

  • mname.to_s ensures you get a string; when mname is nil it will be an empty string "".
  • String#[0] picks up the first character of that string; when the string is empty, it will return nil.
  • #{ } within " " expands the ruby code, and turns it into a string; particularly turns nil into an empty string "".
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+1! But in my 1.8.7 ruby, fname[0] gives me a Fixnum instead of the first character (while 1.9.2 gives me the first character ;D) –  PeterWong Apr 18 '11 at 16:33
    
@PeterWong I forgot about that. In ruby1.8.7, probably [0,1] will work. –  sawa Apr 18 '11 at 16:37
    
Love the simplicity of fname[0] over fname.split("")[0] :D –  PeterWong Apr 19 '11 at 1:41
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