Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm creating a C++/CLI wrapper DLL that depends on numerous C++ static libraries. Some of the function calls expect unmanaged pointers to be passed in. How do i pass them properly?

Also, other functions expect a "this pointer" to be passed in as a void*. What's the right way to pass "this"?

Here's my class definition...

public ref class RTPClient
{
	public:
		RTPClient();
		~RTPClient();

		bool Connect();
		void Disconnect();

	private:
		CIsmaClient* mClient;
};

Here's my usage where the pointers in question are used...

RTPClient::RTPClient():
	mClient(NULL)
{
	CIsmaClient::Create(&mClient, NULL, &AllocBuffer, &GetDataPointer, this);
}

The usage of &mClient and "this" cause the following compiler errors... 1>.\VBLoadSimulatorDll.cpp(40) : error C2664: 'CIsmaClient::Create' : cannot convert parameter 1 from 'cli::interior_ptr' to 'CIsmaClient **' 1> with 1> [ 1> Type=CIsmaClient * 1> ]

1>.\VBLoadSimulatorDll.cpp(40) : error C2664: 'CIsmaClient::Create' : cannot convert parameter 5 from 'VBLoadSimulator::RTPClient ^const ' to 'VOID *'

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you are passing a pointer to a managed class then it is easy to convert the ^ reference into a pointer but you must pin the managed object so that the GC doesn't move it about in memory (thus invalidating the pointer)

This is simple with pin_ptr

However your code is doing two things which won't work

RTPClient::RTPClient():
        mClient(NULL)
{
    CIsmaClient::Create(
        &mClient,          // 1
        NULL, 
        &AllocBuffer, 
        &GetDataPointer, 
        this);            //2
}

1) You are trying to take the address of something on the managed heap (the location of the pointer to the pointer mClient is on the managed heap.

As such it can move in memory, thus the compiler supplier interior pointer (whose value is maintained over GC operations). This needs to be pinned and this will only work if the Create function does not expect to use the pointer after it's scope has ended (if it passes it anywhere else to store it this will lead to bugs).

2) You are passing a handle (the funny hat symbol) rather than a pointer. (Read the wikipedia section on these they are a good overview) This is not (and cannot) be understood by the unmanaged code.

The only reason I can think of for this parameter in this context is as an explicit state variable passed to subsequent function callbacks (correct me if I'm wrong). 'this' in this context is NEVER going to work properly since this can move about in memory once the pin_ptr goes out of scope.

With that in mind here is a (partially) corrected implementation making it clear what can and can't be fixed.

RTPClient::RTPClient():
        mClient(NULL)
{
    // make it clear you want the address of the instance variable
    pin_ptr<CIsmaClient*> pinnedClient = &this->mClient; 
    CIsmaClient::Create(
        pinnedClient,          // fixed
        NULL, 
        &AllocBuffer, 
        &GetDataPointer, 
        x /* pass something else in */);            //2
}

If you supply more information on what the last parameter is used for I can suggest possible solutions

share|improve this answer
    
Here is the correct link: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1dz8byfh.aspx – Juozas Kontvainis Feb 20 '09 at 14:39
    
The pointer is to an unmanaged class though... – cjserio Feb 20 '09 at 14:44
    
if it's unmanaged then simply passing a plain only C++ pointer is just fine. I don't see what the problem is.... – ShuggyCoUk Feb 20 '09 at 14:55
    
I get this error...error C2664: 'CIsmaClient::Create' : cannot convert parameter 1 from 'cli::interior_ptr<Type>' to 'CIsmaClient **'. The pointer i'm passing is a member variable of my managed class however it's a pointer to an unmanaged class – cjserio Feb 20 '09 at 14:58
    
This is an interior pointer (i.e. it points to a value contained within memory controlled by the GC) thus you must pin it (which pins the containing object) simply use the pin_ptr (but remember the resulting plain pointer will remain valid only as long as the pin_ptr is in scope on the stack – ShuggyCoUk Feb 20 '09 at 15:01

I think you'll that this is the simplest way of passing a managed reference via a void pointer:

void SomeFunction(void* input)
{
  gcroot<ManagedClass^>* pointer = (gcroot<ManagedClass^>*)(input);
  (*pointer)->ManagedFunction();
}

void Example()
{
  ManagedClass^ handle = gcnew ManagedClass();
  gcroot<ManagedClass^>* pointer = new gcroot<ManagedClass^>(handle);
  SomeFunction((void*)pointer);
  delete pointer;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why are you using new and delete? – Ben Voigt Jan 23 '14 at 21:00
    
because you cannot take the address of a gcroot. If you want to, you should use GCHandle directly. Also, in many case, don't be affraid to use Obect^* if the underlying Object^ is on the stack. so here : SomeFunction(&handle); and input has to be cast to ManagedClass^* – user1952009 Feb 14 '14 at 23:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.