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I'm carrying out a feasibility study on writing, let's say it's a lightweight run-in-browser MMORPG. (It's not exactly an MMORPG, but would take longer to explain, and the requirements are similar.) I'm trying to figure out the required technology stack.

Client side, it runs in the browser, so the client is Javascript. That was nice and easy :-)

Server side, I'm looking at Java. The common Lamp stack was designed for RESTful applications, as I gather were typical Java web frameworks, and this application is different - it needs a continual stream of data going back and forth between the server and all the clients. I think what I need in this case is Java of the non-framework, full no-holds-barred Java EE variety, someone please correct me if my understanding is incorrect or incomplete? I would need something that is commonly available on reasonably cheap hosting, Java EE fits this description, right?

(Figuring on using MySQL for the database, as this is what's most commonly available. Also I might actually write the code in Scala, being a Java-compatible but supposedly slightly nicer language. I assume neither of these makes any difference?)

Supposing I were writing a website in Lamp, doing at least the initial development on Windows, then I'd install Xamp, which gives you a running copy of the entire server stack right there on your desktop, so you can just alt-tab back and forth between your editor/IDE and browser for testing.

Now my question is: What's the best equivalent setup for Java, for developing something like this on Windows?

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"non-framework, full no-holds-barred Java EE variety" this seems like a contradictory statement to me. – jtahlborn Apr 18 '11 at 0:43
    
Why? Not a rhetorical question, I've only ever used Java client side before. What I need is to be able to run arbitrary Java code on the server, while keeping a permanent connection to Javascript clients over HTTP, and still be compatible with cheap and widely available hosting. What should I be looking for? – rwallace Apr 18 '11 at 0:46
    
well "java EE" is a pretty significant framework... – jtahlborn Apr 18 '11 at 1:26
    
Right, in a sense it is. What I think I'm really saying is that almost all discussion of server-side Java seems to talk about JSP, EJB, Glassfish, Google app server etc which are frameworks in the sense that they put restrictions on what your code can do, whereas Java EE puts no such restrictions, you can use as much or as little of the standard library as you want, but it doesn't stop you running arbitrary persistent Java code. Is that correct? – rwallace Apr 18 '11 at 1:30
    
small suggestion, I'm in the process of working for an online game company myself. If the idea is to be continually releasing new content and features, be careful of how you design the database schema! We are constantly changing ours when designs change or for new features, and the migrations KILL us. – Denise Apr 18 '11 at 2:44
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Right, in a sense it is. What I think I'm really saying is that almost all discussion of server-side Java seems to talk about JSP, EJB, Glassfish, Google app server etc which are frameworks in the sense that they put restrictions on what your code can do, whereas Java EE puts no such restrictions, you can use as much or as little of the standard library as you want, but it doesn't stop you running arbitrary persistent Java code. Is that correct?

You've thrown out a bunch of terms there:

  • Glassfish is an application server that implements (all of) Java EE.

  • JSP is a specification that is part of Java EE, and implemented by application servers such as Glassfish as well as web servers such as Tomcat and (I think) Jetty.

  • EJB is another specifications that are part of Java EE. It is typically implemented by application servers.

  • "Google app server" is really "Google Application Engine" (GAE), and is really a platform for implementing web servers in a cloud computing environment. If that's not what you want / need to do, GAE is probably a blind alley for you.

Glassfish, JBoss, Tomcat, Jetty and so on are all platforms that implement some or all of Java EE. None of them stop you implementing arbitrary persistent Java code.

GAE on the other hand does restrict what you can run, because the platform only allows you to run standard Java classes in a whitelist. If your "arbitrary" code depends on other standard Java classes, you are out of luck. (And hence my warning about blind alleys.)

And of course, there are various other Java-based frameworks that are targeted at web development in one form or another. Some are compatible with Java EE servlets and other EE technology, and some have gone off in a different direction.


My recommendation would be to start with something straight forward using plain servlets on a stock platform. Only look at the high performance stuff if and when performance looks like it will be a real concern (not just a "nice to have"). It is better to have a simple and non-scalable prototype, than a high performance solution that you don't have the time and skills to get working. And you can treat the prototype as a learning exercise.

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A little hard to tell from the requirements given, but I would look at the following based on your description:

http://www.playframework.org/

http://www.zkoss.org/

http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/

Play Framework is a nice web-centric framework that provides a complete stack (you can code in Java or Scala). ZKoss (ZK) and GWT both provide user interface frameworks. ZK, GWT, and Play all run nicely in Tomcat/MySQL and should work just fine in typical Java/MySQL hosting environment.

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... not sure what your definition of 'cheap' is but, that and 'no holds barred Java EE' don't exactly go together. Also, 'frameworks' by themselves don't put restrictions on running any arbitrary java on the server side. When I say 'frameworks' I mean Spring, Struts, etc. Servers will be a little different story. If you need EJBs you'll need Glasfish or JBoss or another EJB compliant container. Hosting with these will be more expensive compared to getting by with Tomcat. IMHO easiest and quickest way to get started is with NetBeans. Comes with Tomcat and / or Glassfish out of the box, all you need is a db.

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