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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Node
{
    int item;   // storage for the node's item
    Node* next;   // pointer to the next node
};
/**************
use reference 
**************/
void addNode(Node*& head, int data , int& count) 
{
    Node * q;     // new node
    q = new Node;  // allocate memory for the new mode
    q->item = data;  // inserting data for the new node
    q->next = head;   // point to previous node ?? how would i do that? ( am i doing it correctly?)
    count++; // keep track of number of node
    head = q;
}

int main()
{
    int a, count = 0;
    int data;
    char callen;
    Node *head = NULL;

    do
    {
        cout << "please enter the data for the next node" << endl;
        cin >> data;
        addNode(head, data, count);
        cout << "do you wish to enter another node? (enter true or false)" << endl;
        cin >> callen;
    }while( callen != 'n' );

    // assuming this is the print function
    while(head != NULL)
    {
        cout << "output" << head->item << endl;
        head = head->next;                      //next element
    }

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

I tried adding a new element in the list how would i move the head around like a LIFO memory (stack) so the last element is on the very top..

Any help would be appreciated ! The pointers and the nodes are messing with my brain lately ....

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7  
When pointers get confusing, take out a piece of paper, draw a picture of the list, then walk through the code and update the picture to reflect the changes that are made to the list as the code executes. –  James McNellis Apr 18 '11 at 1:18
    
It would be a good idea to post code that actually compiles. A few points: count++ affects the local copy of the variable in main... pass it by reference (as an int&) to make the local identifier a pseudonym for the caller's variable. addNode is called with two arguments but requires three. You already have a LIFO system, as you're adding at the head and can (only) pop efficiently from the head. –  Tony D Apr 18 '11 at 1:29
    
@Tony oh yes i fogot to do that. (fix the int & problem) and i cant seem to get it to work. I know i already have a LIFO style. Let me rephrase the question, how do i make it such that everytime i add a new node it jumps to the head to the new node and still link to the node before? –  ricedragon Apr 18 '11 at 1:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the do-while loop try this

addNode(data, count, head);

instead of

addNode( data, count );

Also, change the signature of addNode as follows:

void addNode( int data , int& count , Node*& head)
share|improve this answer
    
@ricedragon I didn't notice that you've changed your code!!! –  rayhan Apr 18 '11 at 2:18
    
@ricedragon Even after the change you've made, I'm not sure if it's going to work. temp isn't changing anywhere. Therefore, all the nodes except the first one will have temp -- the first one as the next element. This is not a linked list. However, this what probably you wanted in the first place. –  rayhan Apr 18 '11 at 2:26
    
im trying to do it like this head empty head -> temp | data -> q| data -> .... continue the list am i doing it right its hard to picture this in my head ... –  ricedragon Apr 18 '11 at 3:15
    
i modify the code base on your explanation i hope it is the things i am aiming for. Comment on it please! thank you! –  ricedragon Apr 18 '11 at 3:52
    
@ricedragon Current code as of 1:13 Eastern Time seems correct to me. This is definitely the right implementation of a linked list. You also need to have two more functions to make it look like a stack. These functions are top and pop. top should return the value stored in the head without deleting it and pop should return the value and at the same time delete the head pointer. Be extra careful when you do that (i.e., implement pop). Make sure that head points to the next element in the stack before you delete the previous pointer. –  rayhan Apr 19 '11 at 17:16

The code shouldn't compile because you are using the variable head in addNode but head is local to main.

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i know i dont have a compiler with me i am doing this off a pen and paper. and typing it in , all these head and pointers are messing with my mind and am all confused. Should i put the head Inside te addNode function? –  ricedragon Apr 18 '11 at 1:52
    
fixed most of it. Read the question from above post. –  ricedragon Apr 18 '11 at 2:06

You could use std::stack for LIFO.

int main()
{
    int a, count=0;
    int data;
    bool repeat;
    stl::stack<int> lifo;

    // assuming it is an empty list at the beginning  and crating a new node below
    cout << "enter some data" << endl;
    cin >> a ;
    lifo.push(a);
    do
    {
        cout << "please enter the data for the next node" <<endl;
        cin >> data;
        lifo.push(data);
        cout << "do you wish to enter another node? (enter true or false)" << endl;
        cin >> repeat;
    }
    while (repeat == true);


    // assuming this is the print function
    while(!lifo.empty()) {
        cout << lifo.pop() << endl;
    }

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
oh, this is a question off the book im suppose to write it my self not use the library. I do wish i can use them tho... –  ricedragon Apr 18 '11 at 2:10
    
You mean std::stack, see cplusplus.com/reference/stl/stack/stack –  dcousens Apr 18 '11 at 2:13
    
@Daniel you are right, I fixed it. :) –  RouMao Apr 18 '11 at 2:16

Sounds like you're trying to learn a bit about link lists. Awesome!

Anyway, I'm not going to give you the exact answer, but I'll give you some pointers in pseudo code, in particular for your addNode member function:

Node* addNode(Node* head, int data, int& count)
{
    create a new node
    let it point to head
    return the pointer to the new node for it to become the new head node
}

int main()
{
    // code...
    head = addNode(head, data, count);
    // more code...
}

As a visual:

head
 \/
node A->node B->node C

new node->?
new node
     \/
    node A->node B->node C
share|improve this answer
    
>> return the pointer to the new node for it to become the new head node -- i been trying to figure out how to do that for the past 5 hours .... hahaha am i doing it wrong ? ^( use the code on the first page i edited again a hour ago) –  ricedragon Apr 18 '11 at 4:14
    
To return something, the function needs to be set up to return first, so you need to change void addNode to Node* addNode as I've done here, and then at the end of your function you need return q which is the new node pointer you created. –  supercheetah Apr 18 '11 at 4:17
    
i did that and i dont really see the difference .... hum... –  ricedragon Apr 18 '11 at 4:42
    
You're going to need to explain more thoroughly what you're trying to accomplish if we're going to help you out. At the moment, the logic of your code should work as seem to think it it will, and will function as a LIFO. Whether it compiles is another matter, and use diagrams. –  supercheetah Apr 19 '11 at 8:03

The way you're doing it, by implementing your addNode function as a push operation, already moves the head around, so the head will always point to the last element you added.

Therefore, to implement a function to delete the last element added, you just need to write a simple pop operation: copy the address of the head, make the second element the new head, and release the memory at the copied address:

Node* oldHead = head;
head = head->next;
delete oldHead;
return head;
share|improve this answer

You could try the following modified code.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Node
{
    int item;   // storage for the node's item
    Node* next;   // pointer to the next node
};
/**************
use reference 
**************/
void addNode(Node*& head, int data , int& count) 
{
    Node * q;     // new node
    q = new Node;  // allocate memory for the new mode
    q->item = data;  // inserting data for the new node
    q->next = head;   // point to previous node ?? how would i do that? ( am i doing it correctly?)
    count++; // keep track of number of node
    head = q;
}

int main()
{
    int a, count = 0;
    int data;
    bool repeat;
    Node *head = NULL;
    // assuming it is an empty list at the beginning  and crating a new node below
    Node *temp;
    temp = new Node ;
    cout << "enter some data" << endl;
    cin >> a ;
    temp->item = a;
    temp->next = head;
    head = temp;
    //^^ assuming thats creating the first node ^^
    do
    {
        cout << "please enter the data for the next node" << endl;
        cin >> data;
        addNode(head, data, count);
        cout << "do you wish to enter another node? (enter true or false)" << endl;
        cin >> repeat;
    }
    while (repeat == true);


    // assuming this is the print function
    temp = head;
    while(temp != NULL)
    {
        cout << "output" << temp->item << endl;
        temp = temp->next;                      //next element
    }


    return 0;
}
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