Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Is there a bijective dictionary in.NET that efficiently stores Key/Values pairs, where both keys and values are distinct, so a bijective mapping (i.e. TryGetValue/TryGetKey) is possible? The naive approach would be to have two internal dictionaries: A key-value and a value-key dictionary, but this is not efficient in terms of memory.

share|improve this question
add comment

marked as duplicate by nawfal, Paul Annetts, Jean, nneonneo, Frank van Puffelen Mar 29 '13 at 11:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers

I don't believe there's one in .NET. Depending on the key/value types, I'm not sure that using two dictionaries is likely to cause that much of an efficiency loss: it's what I'd do until I saw a problem, based on the fact that it's simple.

In fact, it's very simple as I've already implemented it in another Stack Overflow answer. I'll see if I can find it...

EDIT: I found two:

share|improve this answer
add comment

Essentially you want 2 Sets that reference the same binary element. You will always have the overhead of the references to both elements, but you'd have that either way. Each set would need a different comparer, but that's little overhead. Since you referencing the same element, in both set, you don't have 2 copies.

HashSet HashSet Methods/Members

share|improve this answer
add comment

Why is this not effecient in terms of memory? Unless you have only 64MB RAM, it wont be an issue for most (and even large tables). If it gets too big, then you should really look into using a proper database engine instead.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If the values stored in the dictionaries are object types the only memory overhead will be that of the Dictionary object itself.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's easy to "flip" the keys and values.

var source = GetSomeDictionary();
var opposite = source.ToDictionary(x => x.Value, x => x.Key)

this is not efficient in terms of memory

Well, if you find that you truly cannot hold the second dictionary... then you can generate it when needed. This has the additional benefit of not needing to maintain both dictionaries.

But most likely, you can hold the second dictionary - and want to in order to save time.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.