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Env: MathJax 1.1

We modified the styles element in default.js to modify some of the display settings. As you see below, the font-size has been set to 50% which causes MathJax to render properly in Firefox (with 50%) but a much higher font size in Chrome.

If we remove the font-size, it appears properly in Chrome but shows up smaller in Firefox.

  1. What would be the right way to manage the font-size, so that it appears properly on all browsers?
  2. What would be the preferred mechanism to add custom changes to MathJax (such as the one given below), so that we don't break much on a future upgrade.

// // This allows you to change the CSS that controls the menu // appearance. See the extensions/MathMenu.js file for details // of the default settings. //

styles : {
    ".MathJax" : {
         "font-family" : "Arial",
         "font-size": "50%"
  }
}
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1 Answer 1

See my post on the MathJax users forum for details.

The font size is set dynamically by MathJax to try to match the surrounding text properly, so you should not be setting the font-size for MathJax explicitly. If that isn't happening properly, I would like to see the situation where it fails so that the font-size- matching can be improved. It may be that other CSS on the page is interfering with that, so I would need to see a complete page where the problem exists.

You should set the "scale" parameter in the HTML-CSS section of your configuration rather than using CSS directly if you want to change the size of the mathematics relative to the surrounding text. You should not set font-size directly, as this will almost surely cause MathJax to fail.

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Hi. MathJax is nice, but I have some problems with Chrome rendering math larger than in Firefox also. I am not modifying the size at all, but Firefox seems to fit better. Here is a URL to test if you are interested. josiahmanson.com/prose/earth_light_absorption –  Joe Oct 12 '12 at 5:51
    
@Joe, your page looks almost identical to me in both browsers. Can you provide a screen shot that illustrates the the difference you are seeing? Also, what OS and what browser versions are you using? And what renderer is selected if you use the MathJax contextual menu and look in the Math-Settings->Math-Renderer menu? –  Davide Cervone Oct 12 '12 at 15:37
    
I ran into what I think is the same problem - basically Webkit-based browsers display the font nicely, Firefox and IE seem to display it too small. I'm not doing anything particularly fancy, except that I'm loading a web font from Google's webfont service. Here's an example - I get good results in Chrome v26 on Windows 7 and bad results on IE9 and Firefox 17: jsfiddle.net/seeligd/REnLm/31 –  pho79 Jan 19 '13 at 0:09
    
Examples of the pages rendered with the two browsers. I just use the default settings on the browsers, as I am sure most people reading the page would. You can see that the firefox math is not as big and bold and matches the text better. people.cs.tamu.edu/jmanson/files/mathjax_chrome.jpg people.cs.tamu.edu/jmanson/files/mathjax_firefox.jpg –  Joe Jan 19 '13 at 23:03
1  
@pho79, OK, I did some testing with your jsFiddle, and it appears that Firefox doesn't get the proper ex-size for the google font, while WebKit does. See version 32 of your fiddle, where I've added a red box with width and height 1ex. This is the size that MathJax tries to match, and it is doing so properly, it's just that the ex-size is wrong in Firefox. Not sure if this is a flaw in the font (and Firefox is properly using the font's ex-height) or a but in Firefox (and it is getting the right ex-height). But that is the source of the problem. –  Davide Cervone Jan 26 '13 at 21:08
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