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Flocks, we have a framework that allows our researchers to change methods(operations) in a class to suite thier needs while saving those changes. E.g Consider definition of the class foo below. (with version 1 & version 2)

class foo:
   #class version 1
   def operation_1(self):
       # version 1
        pass
   def operation_2(self):
       # version 1
       pass

class foo:
     # class version 2
     def operation_1(self):
        # version 2
        pass
     def operation_2(self):
        # version 2
        pass

another researcher may want to his class to appear as below; ( he is using a method from version 1 and another method from verion 2)

class foo:
    # class version 3
    def operation_1(self):
        # version 1
        pass
    def operation_2(self):
       # version 2
        pass

Currenlty one has to copy and paste the source code. I am looking for a way to generalise this. probably something like

  klass = foo()
  klass.operation_1 = foo.operation_1 #  from ver 1 of foo
  klass.operation_2 = foo.operation_2 #  from ver 2 of foo
  evaluate(klass)

and probably evaluate() is a function that evaluates such expressions. These classes are persistent

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1 Answer 1

type is the metaclass you want.

klass = type('klass', (foo,), {'operation_1': foo.operation_1,
  'operation_2': foo.operation_2})
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tried the code above, and this is my error. TypeError: metaclass conflict: the metaclass of a derived class must be a (non-strict) subclass of the metaclasses of all its bases –  shaz Apr 18 '11 at 8:03
    
Then make all your base classes new-style classes by having them derive from object. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 18 '11 at 8:05
    
@ Ignacia, thanks that was corrected.. Another problem, that i keep runing into. Each method requires to be bound its respective class.'TypeError: unbound method operation_1() must be called with foo instance as first argument (got nothing instead)' same for operation_2 –  shaz Apr 18 '11 at 8:23
    
How does this differentiate between the various foos? –  martineau Apr 18 '11 at 13:27

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