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SELECT count(*) 
FROM contacts_lists 
     JOIN plain_contacts 
          ON contacts_lists.contact_id = plain_contacts.contact_id 
     JOIN contacts 
          ON contacts.id = plain_contacts.contact_id 
WHERE plain_contacts.has_email 
      AND NOT contacts.email_bad 
      AND NOT contacts.email_unsub 
      AND contacts_lists.list_id =67339

how can i optimize this query.. could you please explain...

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1  
Do you have an index on contacts_lists.list_id? You can also try an index on contacts.email_bad (or email_unsub). And please show us the execution plan for the query (ideally using EXPLAIN ANALYZE) –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 18 '11 at 7:41
1  
What problem do you have with that query? –  Endy Tjahjono Apr 18 '11 at 7:42
1  
Whenever you have problems with PostgreSQL queries, post the PostgreSQL version and EXPLAIN ANALYZE of problematic queries. Without these, any response you get is pure speculation. –  intgr Apr 18 '11 at 8:52
    
QUERY PLAN Aggregate (cost=126377.96..126377.97 rows=1 width=0) -> Hash Join (cost=6014.51..126225.38 rows=61033 width=0) Hash Cond: (contacts_lists.contact_id = plain_contacts.contact_id) -> Hash Join (cost=3067.30..121828.63 rows=61033 width=8) Hash Cond: (contacts_lists.contact_id = contacts.id) -> Index Scan using index_contacts_lists_on_list_id_and_contact_id on contacts_lists (cost=0.00..116909.97 rows=61033 width=4) –  Rafiu Apr 19 '11 at 5:44
    
Index Cond: (list_id = 66996) -> Hash (cost=1721.41..1721.41 rows=84551 width=4) -> Seq Scan on contacts (cost=0.00..1721.41 rows=84551 width=4) Filter: ((NOT email_bad) AND (NOT email_unsub)) -> Hash (cost=2474.97..2474.97 rows=37779 width=4) -> Seq Scan on plain_contacts (cost=0.00..2474.97 rows=37779 width=4) Filter: has_email –  Rafiu Apr 19 '11 at 5:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Reformatting your query plan for clarity:

QUERY PLAN Aggregate (cost=126377.96..126377.97 rows=1 width=0)
  -> Hash Join (cost=6014.51..126225.38 rows=61033 width=0)
     Hash Cond: (contacts_lists.contact_id = plain_contacts.contact_id)
    -> Hash Join (cost=3067.30..121828.63 rows=61033 width=8)
       Hash Cond: (contacts_lists.contact_id = contacts.id)
      -> Index Scan using index_contacts_lists_on_list_id_and_contact_id
         on contacts_lists (cost=0.00..116909.97 rows=61033 width=4)
         Index Cond: (list_id = 66996)
         -> Hash (cost=1721.41..1721.41 rows=84551 width=4)
         -> Seq Scan on contacts (cost=0.00..1721.41 rows=84551 width=4)
            Filter: ((NOT email_bad) AND (NOT email_unsub))
            -> Hash (cost=2474.97..2474.97 rows=37779 width=4)
            -> Seq Scan on plain_contacts (cost=0.00..2474.97 rows=37779 width=4)
               Filter: has_email

Two partial indexes might eliminate seq scans depending on your data distribution:

-- if many contacts have bad emails or are unsubscribed:
CREATE INDEX contacts_valid_email_idx ON contacts (id)
WHERE (NOT email_bad AND NOT email_unsub);

-- if many contacts have no email:
CREATE INDEX plain_contacts_valid_email_idx ON plain_contacts (id)
WHERE (has_email);

You might be missing an index on a foreign key:

CREATE INDEX plain_contacts_contact_id_idx ON plain_contacts (contact_id);

Last but not least if you've never analyzed your data, you need to run:

VACUUM ANALYZE;

If it's still slow once all that is done, there isn't much you can do short of merging your plain_contacts and your contacts tables: getting the above query plan in spite of the above indexes means most/all of your subscribers are subscribed to that particular list -- in which case the above query plan is the fastest you'll get.

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thanks for reply. But this vacuum analyze is automatically done in postgresql 8.4 by Auto-Vacuum Daemon. The id and contact_id were changed asper our selection in my app. –  Rafiu May 11 '11 at 7:39
    
Having the auto-vaccum daemon is great, but it shouldn't prevent you from periodically running a vacuum analyze if your data has changed in any significant way. –  Denis May 11 '11 at 15:13

This is already a very simple query that the database will run in the most efficient way providing that statistics are up to date

So in terms of the query itself there's not much to do.

In terms of database administration you can add indexes - there should be indexes in the database for all the join conditions and also for the most selective part of the where clause (list_id, contact_id as FK in plain_contacts and contacts_lists). This is the most significant opportunity to improve performance of this query (orders of magnitude). Still as SpliFF notes, you probably already have those indexes, so check.

Also, postgres has good explain command that you should learn and use. It will help with optimizing queries.

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thanks for your kind response. –  Rafiu Apr 19 '11 at 5:47
    
ya I already have these two as indexes.Any other way to optimize this query.If any could you please explain. –  Rafiu Apr 19 '11 at 5:53
    
Are you theoretically interested or do you need to improve the speed of the query? –  Unreason Apr 19 '11 at 7:49
    
SELECT count(contacts_lists.contact_id) FROM contacts_lists where contacts_lists.list_id =66996 AND contacts_lists.contact_id in(select id from contacts where (NOT contacts.email_bad AND NOT contacts.email_unsub) and id in(select plain_contacts.contact_id from plain_contacts where plain_contacts.has_email)) –  Rafiu Apr 19 '11 at 13:29
    
now i changed the query like this. could you please explain which one is best. –  Rafiu Apr 19 '11 at 13:30

You can use SELECT count(1) ... but other than that I'd say it looks fine. You could always cache some parts of the query using views or put indexes on contact_id and list_id if you're really struggling (I assume you have one on id already).

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There no performance difference whatsoever between count(*) and count(1) –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 18 '11 at 7:39
    
there used to be. –  SpliFF Apr 18 '11 at 7:42
    
which version? And can you prove it? I doubt that there ever was a difference. –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 18 '11 at 7:45
    
I came across it in the user notes for Postgres 7.3 I believe. Doesn't mean it was right, could easily be an assumption going way back. –  SpliFF Apr 18 '11 at 8:02
1  
7.x is nothing to take as a reference any more. Actually any (performance) information that is based on a version before 8.1 is absolete. –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 18 '11 at 8:44

Since you only want to inlude rows that has some flags set in the joined tables, I would move that statements into the join clause:

SELECT count(*) 
FROM contacts_lists 
     JOIN plain_contacts 
          ON contacts_lists.contact_id = plain_contacts.contact_id 
          AND NOT plain_contacts.has_email
     JOIN contacts 
          ON contacts.id = plain_contacts.contact_id 
          AND NOT contacts.email_unsub 
          AND NOT contacts.email_bad 
WHERE contacts_lists.list_id =67339

I'm not sure if this would make a great impact on performance, but worth a try. You should probably have indexes on the joined tables as well for optimal performance, like this:

plain_contacts: contact_id, has_email
contacts: id, email_unsub, email_bad
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Thanks for your response . But it give the same result as the earlier. –  Rafiu Apr 19 '11 at 10:46
    
SELECT count(contacts_lists.contact_id) FROM contacts_lists where contacts_lists.list_id =66996 AND contacts_lists.contact_id in(select id from contacts where (NOT contacts.email_bad AND NOT contacts.email_unsub) and id in(select plain_contacts.contact_id from plain_contacts where plain_contacts.has_email)) –  Rafiu Apr 19 '11 at 13:30
    
now i changed the query like this. could you please explain which one is best. –  Rafiu Apr 19 '11 at 13:31
    
It all depends on which indexes you have. The better one would be the fastest one, as simple as that. Upside with your version is that it can utilize indexes without the id-column better, if you have that (for instance, an index on only email_bad or email_unsub) –  jishi Apr 19 '11 at 13:43
    
Thank you for your nice response. –  Rafiu Apr 25 '11 at 11:54

Have you run ANALYZE on the database recently? Do the row counts in the EXPLAIN plan look like they make sense? (Looks like you ran only EXPLAIN. EXPLAIN ANALYZE gives both estimated and actual timings.)

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