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Is it possible to make

public class MyClass : Dictionary<string, Func<string>>

as

public class MyClass : Dictionary<string, Func<T>>

Actually I have

public class MyClass : Dictionary<string, Func<string>>
{
    public void MyFunction(string key)
    {
        if (this.ContainsKey(key))
            this[key]();
        else
            this["no match"]();
    }
}

I want to make the value as generic. is it possible?

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

The type has to be specified somewhere, so you would have to make your class generic also:

public class Myclass<T> : Dictionary<string, Func<T>> {

  public T MyFunction(string key) {
    if (this.ContainsKey(key)) {
      return this[key]();
    } else {
      return this["no match"]();
    }
  }

}
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You can specify the type as par the object instantiation. I have provided working code.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace GenericDictionary
{
    class Program
    {

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            DictionaryUser dictionaryUser = new DictionaryUser();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        class GenericFuncDictionary<T> : Dictionary<string, Func<T>>
        {
            public void DisplayValues()
            {
                foreach(Func<T> fun in this.Values)
                    Console.WriteLine(fun());
            }
        }

        class DictionaryUser
        {
            public DictionaryUser()
            {
                GenericFuncDictionary<string> myDictionary = new GenericFuncDictionary<string>();
                myDictionary.Add("World", FunWorld);
                myDictionary.Add("Universe", FunUniverse);
                myDictionary.DisplayValues();
            }
            public string FunWorld()
            {
                return "Hello World";
            }
            public string FunUniverse()
            {
                return "Hello Universe";
            }
        }
    }
}
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It wasn't entirely clear if you want the type parameter of your Func<T> to be part of the MyClass signature (e.g. MyType<T>) as other answers assumed or if you wanted to be able to store any type of Func<T> in the dictionary and figure out the right thing at runtime.

If you want the latter case and you use C# 4.0 then you can do this:

class MyClass : Dictionary<string, Func<object>>
{
    public void MyFunction<T>(string key)
    {
        Func<object> func;
        if (this.TryGetValue(key, out func) && func is Func<T>)
            func();
        else
        {
            func = this["no match"];
            if (func is Func<T>)
                func();
            else
            { */ do something else, or maybe you don't care about the type of "no match" */ }
        }
    }
}

The reason for using C# 4.0 with this is that you can now write:

MyClass myClass = ...;
Func<string> stringFunc = ...;
myClass["test"] = stringFunc;

Prior to C# 4.0 it was not possible to cast an Func<string> to a Func<object>. In that case you would have to write either of these two lines (can't be bothered to check if the first line would compile prior to 4.0):

myClass["test"] = () => stringFunc();
myClass["test"] = () => (object) stringFunc();

And to use it you could write:

MyClass myClass = ...;
myClass.MyFunction<string>("test");
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The following scenario would allow you to use a dictionary of elements to send in as input parameters and get the same as the output parameters.

First add the following line at the top:

using TFunc = System.Func<System.Collections.Generic.IDictionary<string, object>, System.Collections.Generic.IDictionary<string, object>>;

Then inside your class, define the dictionary as follows:

     private Dictionary<String, TFunc> actions = new Dictionary<String, TFunc>(){

                        {"getmultipledata", (input) => 
                            {
                                //DO WORKING HERE
                                return null;
                            } 
                         }, 
                         {"runproc", (input) => 
                            {
                                //DO WORKING HERE
                                return null;
                            } 
                         }
 };

This would allow you to run these anonymous functions with a syntax similar to this:

var output = actions["runproc"](inputparam);
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