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from twisted.internet import reactor
from twisted.internet import threads
from twisted.internet import defer
import time

def worker(arg):
    print 'Hello world'
     time.sleep(10)
    return 1

def run():
    print 'Starting workers'
    l = []
    for x in range(2):
        l.append(threads.deferToThread(worker, x))
    return defer.DeferredList(l)

def res(results):
    print results
    reactor.stop()

d = run()
d.addCallback(res)
reactor.run()

How to stop workers by timeout ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Threads cannot be interrupted unless they cooperate with you. time.sleep(10) is not going to cooperate, so I don't think you can interrupt this worker. If you have another kind of worker that has several discrete phases, or operates in a loop over some tasks, then you can do something like this:

def worker(stop, jobs):
    for j in jobs:
        if stop:
            break
        j.do()

stop = []
d = deferToThread(worker)

# This will make the list eval to true and break out of the loop.
stop.append(None)

This isn't Twisted specific, either. This is just how threads work in Python.

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Well, my answer is not about threads, but as it was said, you can implement timeout functionality as a separate helper:

from twisted.internet import defer

def add_watchdog(deferred, timeout=0.05):

    def callback(value):
        if not watchdog.called:
            watchdog.cancel()
        return value

    deferred.addBoth(callback)

    from twisted.internet import reactor
    watchdog = reactor.callLater(timeout, defer.timeout, deferred)

d = defer.Deferred()
add_watchdog(d)

Then you can trap defer.TimeoutError in deferred's errback if you need.

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While it may not be possible to interrupt the threads, the Deferred can be stopped via the cancel function, which I think is available in Twisted 10.1.0 and later.

I've used the following class to make Deferreds that callback a particular function if the Deferred hasn't fired after some time. It might be useful for someone that has the same question as that posed in the subject of the OP.

class DeferredWithTimeout(defer.Deferred):
    '''
    A deferred that allows a specified function to be called-back
    if the deferred does not fire before some specified timeout.
    '''
    def __init__(self, canceller=None):
        defer.Deferred.__init__(self, canceller)

    def _finish(self, r, t):
        '''
        Function to be called (internally) after the Deferred
        has fired, in order to cancel the timeout.
        '''
        if ( (t!=None) and (t.active()) ):
            t.cancel()
        return r

    def addTimeoutCallback(self, reactr, timeout,
                           callUponTimeout, *args, **kw):
        '''
        The function 'callUponTimeout' (with optional args or keywords)
        will be called after 'timeout' seconds, unless the Deferred fires.
        Note that if a canceller was specified, the canceller will also be
        called at timeout, and it will be called before callUponTimeout.
        '''

        def timeoutCallback():
            self.cancel()
            callUponTimeout(*args, **kw)
        toc = reactr.callLater(timeout, timeoutCallback)
        return self.addCallback(self._finish, toc)

Example callback before timeout:

from twisted.internet import reactor

d = DeferredWithTimeout()

def testCallback(x=None):
    print "called"

def testTimeout(x=None):
    print "timedout"

d.addCallback(testCallback)
d.addTimeoutCallback(reactor, 20, testTimeout, "to")
reactor.callLater(2, d.callback, "cb")
reactor.run()

Prints "called" and nothing else.

Example timeout before callback:

from twisted.internet import reactor

d = DeferredWithTimeout()

def testCallback(x=None):
    print "called"

def testTimeout(x=None):
    print "timedout"

d.addCallback(testCallback)
d.addTimeoutCallback(reactor, 20, testTimeout, "to")
reactor.run()

Prints "timedout" after 20 seconds, and nothing else.

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1  
You really shouldn't subclass Deferred. Implement this functionality as a separate helper, not a subclass. pyvideo.org/video/1684/… –  Jean-Paul Calderone Sep 26 '13 at 11:33
    
In addition to the usual warnings about not subclassing things, Deferred is a particularly bad thing to subclass, because its behavior assumes very specific things about its own implementation, and will not react well to having certain methods overridden. –  Glyph Sep 26 '13 at 19:15

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