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This is an interview question I saw on some site.

It was mentioned that the answer involves forming a recurrence of log2() as follows:

double log2(double x )
{
if ( x<=2 ) return 1;
 if ( IsSqureNum(x) )
   return log2(sqrt(x) ) * 2;
 return log2( sqrt(x) ) * 2 + 1; // Why the plus one here.
}

as for the recurrence, clearly the +1 is wrong. Also, the base case is also erroneous. Does anyone know a better answer? How is log() and log10() actually implemented in C.

share|improve this question
    
+1 for the question. I just tried with 100 as input and it returned 30. Method is not complete. – Sandeep G B Apr 18 '11 at 9:53
1  
There is an algorithm on wikipedia en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_logarithm – Cyril Gandon Apr 19 '11 at 6:44
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Perhaps I have found the exact answers the interviewers were looking for. From my part, I would say it's little bit difficult to derive this under interview pressure. The idea is, say you want to find log2(13), you can know that it lies between 3 to 4. Also 3 = log2(8) and 4 = log2(16),

from properties of logarithm, we know that log( sqrt( (8*16) ) = (log(8) + log(16))/2 = (3+4)/2 = 3.5

Now, sqrt(8*16) = 11.3137 and log2(11.3137) = 3.5. Since 11.3137<13, we know that our desired log2(13) would lie between 3.5 and 4 and we proceed to locate that. It is easy to notice that this has a Binary Search solution and we iterate up to a point when our value converges to the value whose log2() we wish to find. Code is given below:

double Log2(double val)
{
    int lox,hix;
    double rval, lval;
    hix = 0;
    while((1<<hix)<val)
        hix++;
    lox =hix-1;
    lval = (1<<lox) ;
    rval = (1<<hix);
    double lo=lox,hi=hix;
   // cout<<lox<<" "<<hix<<endl;
    //cout<<lval<<" "<<rval;
    while( fabs(lval-val)>1e-7)
    {
        double mid = (lo+hi)/2;
        double midValue = sqrt(lval*rval);

        if ( midValue > val)
        {
             hi = mid;
             rval = midValue;
        }
        else{
            lo=mid;
            lval = midValue;
        }
    }
    return lo;

}
share|improve this answer

It's been a long time since I've written pure C, so here it is in C++ (I think the only difference is the output function, so you should be able to follow it):

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

const static double CUTOFF = 1e-10;

double log2_aux(double x, double power, double twoToTheMinusN, unsigned int accumulator) {
     if (twoToTheMinusN < CUTOFF)
       return accumulator * twoToTheMinusN * 2;
     else {
       int thisBit;
       if (x > power) {
            thisBit = 1;
            x /= power;
       }
       else
            thisBit = 0;
       accumulator = (accumulator << 1) + thisBit;
       return log2_aux(x, sqrt(power), twoToTheMinusN / 2.0, accumulator);
     }
}

double mylog2(double x) {
     if (x < 1)
       return -mylog2(1.0/x);
     else if (x == 1)
       return 0;
     else if (x > 2.0)
       return mylog2(x / 2.0) + 1;
     else
       return log2_aux(x, 2.0, 1.0, 0);
}

int main() {
     cout << "5 " << mylog2(5) << "\n";
     cout << "1.25 " << mylog2(1.25) << "\n";
     return 0;
}

The function 'mylog2' does some simple log trickery to get a related number which is between 1 and 2, then call log2_aux with that number.

The log2_aux more or less follows the algorithm that Scorpi0 linked to above. At each step, you get 1 bit of the result. When you have enough bits, stop.

If you can get a hold of a copy, the Feynman Lectures on Physics, number 23, starts off with a great explanation of logs and more or less how to do this conversion. Vastly superior to the Wikipedia article.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you are missing some corner cases, for 4 I get 1.5, where it clearly should be 2. – Shamim Hafiz Apr 21 '11 at 7:06
    
what crap is this ! – Spandan Aug 10 '13 at 8:23

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