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Why so?

>>> max(2, 2.01)
2.0099999999999998
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2  
Because that's how floating point numbers work: download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E19957-01/806-3568/… – duffymo Apr 18 '11 at 10:12
    
Take a look at float-str-float wierdness on StackOverflow – Mike Pennington Apr 18 '11 at 10:13
    
Thanks.Just getting the hang of things.. – Jibin Apr 18 '11 at 10:27
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The number 2.01 represented in binary is:

b10.00000010100011111100001010001111110000101000111111000010100011111100...

The computer uses only a finite number of digits to store floating-point values, but the binary representation of 2.01 requires infinitely many digits; as a result, it is rounded to the closest representable value:

b10.000000101000111111000010100011111100001010001111110

Expressed in decimal, this number is exactly:

2.0099999999999997868371792719699442386627197265625

When you print it out, it is rounded a second time to seventeen decimal digits, giving:

2.0099999999999998
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Floating point numbers do not encode exact values, but approximations. The result is essentially the next nearest floating point number to the real number you entered.

http://docs.python.org/tutorial/floatingpoint.html

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because:

>>> 2.01
2.0099999999999998

it's the way floating point numbers are stored

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Floating point roundoff. Its trying to say 2.01 but can't express it exactly as a floating point number so its doing the best it can.

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