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Consider:

t=0 ; for i in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ; do t=$((t+i)) ; done ; echo $t

prints 55.

But:

totsize=0
find /home/user -type f -mmin -4860 -a -mmin +3420 | xargs du | \
while read size rest ; do
    totsize=$((totsize+size))
    echo "$totsize"
done
echo "Sum: $totsize kb"

Prints "Sum: 0 kb" even tho the interim print statement prints a reasonable sum.

I know I have encountered this issue before, but have never understood it. What is difference?

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Right answer goes to kurumi by toss of coin. sehe: +1 for < <() vs |, kurumi: +1 for find -printf. Thx all. –  Bittrance Apr 18 '11 at 13:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

that's because the pipes create a subshell so totsize is "local" inside that subshell. you can try this instead (bash)

totsize=0
while read size rest ; do
    totsize=$((totsize+size))
    echo "$totsize"
done < <(find /home/user -type f -mmin -4860 -a -mmin +3420 | xargs du)
echo "Sum: $totsize kb"

Or instead of using bash, call awk

$> find /home/user -type f -mmin -4860 -a -mmin +3420 | xargs du | awk  '{s+=$1}END{print "total size: "s}'

But are you sure you want to use just du without any options, because the size is not "accurate" (using du -b would be better). If you have GNU find, you can use -printf

find /home/user -type f -mmin -4860 -a -mmin +3420 -printf "%s\n" | awk  '{s+=$1}END{print "total size: "s" bytes"}'
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+1 for suggesting -printf –  sehe Apr 18 '11 at 12:34
totsize=0

while read size rest ; do
    totsize=$((totsize+size))
    echo "$totsize"
done < <(find /home/user -type f -mmin -4860 -a -mmin +3420 | xargs du)
echo "Sum: $totsize kb"

Prevent a subshell, because a subshell will limit the scope of totsize


Spending a few more words:

do_something < <(subprocess)
  • will run do_something in the main shell (this is input redirection with process substitution)

.

subprocess | do_something
  • will run do_something in a separate (sub) shell (this is a pipe subprocess)
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This is a common problem. The right-hand side elements of a pipeline run in a subshell. In this case, both xargs and while will run in a child process of the shell (they all run in parallel, so they must be separate processes).

You will need to refactor your code so you are not accumulating the value in a subshell. Others have shown the bash refactoring. Here's a method using awk:

find /home/user -type f -mmin -4860 -a -mmin +3420 | xargs du \
| awk '{sum += $1} END {print sum}'

Put that in a shell function if you want to capture the sum in a variable:

sum_usage() { ...above pipeline... ; }
totsize=$(sum_usage)

You can put it all within $(...), but I think it's easier to read using shell functions.

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+1 for suggesting shell functions –  sehe Apr 18 '11 at 12:33

Probably this happens because of some subshell creation (see man bash, search for COMMAND EXECUTION ENVIRONMENT).

But You can do without while:

find . -type f -mmin -4860 -a -mmin +3420 | xargs du | awk '{sum=sum+$1} END {print "Total: " sum " kb."}'

HTH

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