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Here is my situation :
I have a ThreadManager launching BackgroundWorkers; I subscribe to the doWork event to Log stuff in it. I also subscribo to the doWork event in the BackgroundWorker itself to process stuff. Well, The first subscription raises the event way after the second one was raised.

class ThreadManager
{
  //(...)
  for (int i = 0; i<100; i++)
  {
   myWorker wk = new myWorker();
   wk.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(wk_DoWork);
  }
  //(...)

  public void wk_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
      Console.Out.Write("PONG");
      //(...) Workers Management logic (Pooling, priority, etc.)
    }
}


internal class myWorker : : BackgroundWorker
{
   //(...)
   DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(DoMe);
   //(...)

   void DoMe(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
   {
      Console.Out.Write("PING");
      //(...) Run a 2-3mn file reading process           
   }
}

For some reason, I am getting all "Pings" in a row, and start getting Pongs only a few minutes after.

Is there something I am missing here ?

EDIT :
I do not use "Console" per se, but asynchronous loggers (that was for the example). I have been careful to watch the debug process at the "PONG" line, and it is not hit way after the "PING"s has been launched.

MY SOLUTION : This is exactly the extra code I was hoping to avoid, but I could'nt cut the pain finally. So here it is, for those having the same issu and stumbling on this post :

class ThreadManager
{
  //(...)
  for (int i = 0; i<100; i++)
  {
   myWorker wk = new myWorker();
   wk.StartedEvent += new myWorker.startDelegate(wk_Started);
  }
  //(...)

  public void wk_Started(params-if-needed)
    {
      Console.Out.Write("PONG");
      //(...) Do Stuff
    }
}   

internal class myWorker : BackgroundWorker
{
   public delegate void startDelegate(string ID);
   public event startDelegate StartedEvent;

   protected override void OnDoWork(DoWorkEventArgs e)
   {
      StartedEvent(ID); //put whatever parameter suits you or nothing
      base.OnDoWork(e);
      e.Result = e.Argument;

      Console.Out.Write("PING");
      //(...) Do Stuff     
   }
}
share|improve this question
    
Side-note, 2-3 min is kind of long for a Bgw (ThreadPool). –  Henk Holterman Apr 18 '11 at 12:28
    
@Henk: Is there any explanation for that estimate of yours? –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 18 '11 at 12:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are missing the following:
The subscribers to the DoWork event are not called in parallel but in a serial manner, i.e. first your handler with PING and after that the handler with PONG. So, when the PING handler takes 3 minutes, the PONG handler will be executed three minutes after you called RunWorkerAsync.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh God, Nooo Way ! I was sure That event handling was instanteneous (as I used to use it in GUIs and never noticed a delay, as there were too short). So. Is there a way to parallelize event handlers or what ? –  Mehdi LAMRANI Apr 18 '11 at 12:33

DoWork is a normal event, and with multicast, it's a sequential call-chain, and BackgroundWorker does not change that.

In short, it's not typical to hang multiple event handlers off of that event.

So yes, it's perfectly natural, since you specifically mention in your comments that the first event handler runs for 2-3 minutes, then yes, the second event handler will start a few minutes later.

share|improve this answer

As far as I know, Console.Out.Write is buffered. Try WriteLine.

share|improve this answer
    
Nothing to do with the problem, i guess. see edit –  Mehdi LAMRANI Apr 18 '11 at 12:35
    
Oh, alright. :-) –  David Pfeffer Apr 18 '11 at 16:54

This might be unrelated, but it's recommended to override OnXXX methods in derived classes rather then subscribe to own events. Thus,

class MyWorker : BackgroundWorker
{
    protected override void OnDoWork(...) { .... }
}

And do not forget to call base.OnDoWork().

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I thought so but yet was not sure as I did not want to take the risk to change legacy code. Thanks for the hint –  Mehdi LAMRANI Apr 18 '11 at 12:34

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