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Consider the following example code

class A:
    def __init__(self, i):
        self.i = i
        print("Initializing object {}".format(self.i))

    def __del__(self):
        print("Deleting object {}".format(self.i))

for i in [1, 2]:
    a = A(i)

Creating the object within the loop was intended to assure that the destructor of A would be called before the new A object would be created. But apparently the following happens:

Initializing object 1

Initializing object 2

Deleting object 1

Deleting object 2

Why is the destructor of object 1 only called after the new object has been initialized? Is this an intended behaviour? I know that the for loop has no own scope in python. In C++, for example, the destructor of 1 would certainly be called before the constructor for object 2 (at least if the object is declared within the loop).

In my program I want to assure that the old object is deleted before the new one is created. Is there another possibility apart from deleting a explicitly at the end of the for loop?

Thanks in advance.

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Interesting thing happen if you change the loop to over [1,2,3]. –  KennyTM Apr 18 '11 at 12:38
1  
This would make a nice interview question. –  pajton Apr 18 '11 at 12:39
4  
Re last paragraph: You don't want to do that. Because you can't (GC is non-deterministic and refcounting is an implementation detail), and you don't need to anyway. If you have resources to dispose, use a context manager (with statement) or add a method like .close() and make sure it's called. –  delnan Apr 18 '11 at 13:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Creation of the second object happens before the name is rebound and the first object is disposed of.

  1. The first A is instantiated.
  2. a is bound.
  3. The second A is instantiated.
  4. a is rebound, and the first A is disposed of.
  5. The program ends, and the second A is disposed of.
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Thanks for the quick and detailed answer! Should I use del to be sure, the previous instance is deleted then? –  shark.dp Apr 18 '11 at 12:40
    
isn't this implementation detail? –  David Heffernan Apr 18 '11 at 12:43
    
You are right. Let me put it this way: I guess there is no way to implement this within the definition of the class A? –  shark.dp Apr 18 '11 at 12:48
    
@shark my question was directed at ignacio I should have been more clear. –  David Heffernan Apr 18 '11 at 12:50
1  
@Ignacio That's why a context manager feels right to me. The syntax makes the intent clear. I'm not sure of the idiomatic way to do this. –  David Heffernan Apr 18 '11 at 13:01

You can't rely on the garbage collector's implementation details when planning lifetime dependencies. You need to do this explicitly one way or another.

Context managers spring to mind, for example:

from contextlib import contextmanager

@contextmanager
def deleting(obj):
    try:
        yield
    finally:
        del(obj)

class A:
    def __init__(self, i):
        self.i = i
        print("Initializing object {}".format(self.i))

    def __del__(self):
        print("Deleting object {}".format(self.i))

for i in [1,2]:
    with deleting(A(i)) as obj:
        pass

print

for i in [1,2]:
    a = A(i)

This produces the following output:

Initializing object 1
Deleting object 1
Initializing object 2
Deleting object 2

Initializing object 1
Initializing object 2
Deleting object 1
Deleting object 2
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Thanks a lot for the detailed answer –  shark.dp Apr 18 '11 at 17:20

Assuming that you want the object to be defined as its final value when the loop exits, don't delete the object explicitly at the end of the for loop, do so at the beginning of the loop, like this:

class A:
    def __init__(self, i):
        self.i = i
        print("Initializing object {}".format(self.i))

    def __del__(self):
        print("Deleting object {}".format(self.i))

for i in [1, 2, 3]:
    a = None
    a = A(i)

That prints:

Initializing object 1
Deleting object 1
Initializing object 2
Deleting object 2
Initializing object 3
Deleting object 3

(Note: Ignatio is right about why it works the way it works, but KennyTM is right, too, that to make it more obvious what is happening you should make it go at least three times through the loop.)

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