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If I know that one set is a subset of another set and I would like to find the intersection, what's the most efficient way to do this:

ex. PSEUDO CODE

> set<int> set1 = {1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10}
> set<int> set2 = { 5 6 7}

I want to subtract set2 from set 1:

the answer here would be

{1 2 3 4  8 9 10}

Thanks

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1  
what would you like? difference or intersection? make your mind up! ;) –  Nim Apr 18 '11 at 12:51
2  
    
possible duplicate of c++ STL set difference –  phresnel Jul 20 '12 at 15:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Use std::set_difference found in <algorithm>:

#include <algorithm>
#include <set>
#include <iterator>
// ...
std::set<int> s1, s2;
// Fill in s1 and s2 with values
std::set<int> result;
std::set_difference(s1.begin(), s1.end(), s2.begin(), s2.end(),
    std::inserter(result, result.end()));

Snippet source

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I would use std::set_difference, which runs in O(n) time.

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which runs in O(n) time depends on implementation. –  orlp Apr 18 '11 at 12:51
3  
@nightcracker: nope, it's guaranteed by the standard. –  ybungalobill Apr 18 '11 at 12:55
    
@ybungalobill: Any link? –  orlp Apr 18 '11 at 12:56
    
@nightcracker: see The ISO C++ standard section [alg.set.operations]. –  ybungalobill Apr 18 '11 at 12:58
1  
@ybungalobill: Ah found it, §25.4.5.4 set_difference, Remark 4: "At most 2 * ((last1 - first1) + (last2 - first2)) - 1 comparisons." Indeed, O(n). –  orlp Apr 18 '11 at 13:09

set_symmetric_difference

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{1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10} - { 5 6 7 11} would include 11? –  Will Apr 18 '11 at 12:55
    
Yes, it will because it's not in the first set. I see now that the OP wanted to subtract a subset (which would not include any numbers not in the original) of the set. I got excited and assumed he just wanted what was different between any two sets. –  Pete Apr 18 '11 at 13:12

You can use std::set_difference function.

the output range contains a copy of every element that is contained in [first1, last1) and not contained in [first2, last2).

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std:: not stl::! –  Benoit Apr 18 '11 at 12:57

I know you asked for a C++ solution, but if somebody gets here looking for a Java solution:

    final Set<Integer> s1 = new HashSet<Integer>(Arrays.asList(new Integer[] {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10}));
    final Set<Integer> s2 = new HashSet<Integer>(Arrays.asList(new Integer[] {5,6,7}));

    s1.removeAll(s2);
    System.out.println(s1);

Results in: [1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10]

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1  
Sorry, I'm afraid this isn't going to be very useful... –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 18 '11 at 13:15

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