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var html = '<div><a href="#" id="test">Btn</a></div>';
$(html).find("#test").click(function(){
  console.log("clicked");
});
//later
$(htmlNode).html(html);

Why don't I receive the "clicked" log?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to append the jQuery object, rather than just setting the inner HTML:

var html = $('<div><a href="#" id="test">Btn</a></div>');
html.find("#test").click(function(){
  console.log("clicked");
});
//later
$(htmlNode).append(html);

EDIT: Use append instead of html to be more clear, even though html seems to functionally equivalent to .empty().append(val) when passing in a jQuery object.

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1  
I believe this to be equivalent to what he has already. You've merely defined html to be a jQuery object rather than the HTML. He has your first line on his second line with $(html). Further, you set the html value to html, which won't work as you've defined html to be a jQuery object. – Adam Terlson Apr 18 '11 at 14:21
    
it doesnt work :( – jimy Apr 18 '11 at 14:22
    
@Adam @jimy Huh? It works. Try it. Setting html to be a jQuery object instead of a string makes all the difference. – Emmett Apr 18 '11 at 14:25
    
By golly, it does. Never seen anyone use html() to effectively do what append() does. Any functional difference between doing that vs a empty() and then append()? – Adam Terlson Apr 18 '11 at 14:30
    
If you look at the html() documentation (api.jquery.com/html) there isn't even a function definition (that I'm seeing) that takes a jQuery object! It's: .html( htmlString ). You've found an undocumented feature! :) – Adam Terlson Apr 18 '11 at 14:32

you are only attaching the click event to the html..you are not actually firing off the click event

try calling .click() after you attach the event.

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I think it's safe to assume he's attempting to click on the anchor that was added to the page. – Adam Terlson Apr 18 '11 at 14:24
    
Thanks Adam for clearing that out... :) – Aron Woost Apr 18 '11 at 19:22

It should be:

$(htmlNode).html(html).filter("#test").click(function(){
  console.log("clicked");
});

Or you can do:

$("#test").live('click',function(){
    console.log("clicked");
});

And create your html later

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The issue is that you're binding a click event to something that isn't in the DOM yet and isn't a jQuery object. You can take two approaches.

1) Use Live:

$("#test").live('click', function(){
  console.log("clicked");
});
//later
var html = '<div><a href="#" id="test">Btn</a></div>';
$(htmlNode).html(html);

2) Construct a proper jQuery DOM object, and bind to that.

var a = $('<a></a>').attr('href', '#').click(function() {
  console.log("clicked");
});
//later
$(htmlNode).html(a.wrap('<div></div>').html()); //This could also use append or appendTo.

The best approach depends on your situation. Be sure to consider that appends to the DOM are very expensive in JavaScript!

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He's trying to 1) create a DOM element, then 2) attach an event to it (in that order), so live is uncalled for. – Emmett Apr 18 '11 at 14:28
1  
For all you know his example was merely illustrative, as is mine. Live is a perfectly appropriate solution to binding events to DOM elements that don't exist but will later. All he needs to do is reorder his code. And even if the order were some how relevant, I also provided option #2. But generally yes, it's not necessary to do Live in cases where you have control over the HTML as he seems to. But, again, for all you know that html string he has is coming from a service, in which case using Live is more than "called" for. – Adam Terlson Apr 18 '11 at 14:36

Like above you are trying to add a click event to a dom element that doesn't yet exist.

$.live is an ok option but unfortunately a pain to maintain in large applications and is rather slow.

You can wrap the event binding in a timeout which pushes the event binding to the end of the queue - which means the event biding will execute AFTER you push your new elements to the dom. Like this:

var html = '<div><a href="#" id="test">Btn</a></div>';
setTimeout(function(){$("#test").click(function(){
  console.log("clicked");
});},0);
//later
$(htmlNode).html(html);
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