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I have the following code:

foreach (Logs log in _logsDutyStatusChange)
{
    string driverid = log.did;
}

How would I only add distinct driver ID's to the driverid string?

Thanks

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8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code isn't adding anything right now, it's just setting a string (declared in the scope of the loop) to each value. The end result would be only the last value, and it would be out of scope to the following code anyway. If you're trying to append them all to a string, separated by commas, e.g., try this:

string driverids = string.Join(",", _logsDutyStatusChange
  .Select(item=>item.did)
  .Distinct()
  .ToArray());
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mhh ... maybe use IEnumerable< T >'s Distinct() function?

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1  
+1, but an example would be useful if the OP doesn't know Linq ;) –  Thomas Levesque Apr 18 '11 at 14:21
    
well ... it seems that there are some examples on this page ;) –  DarkSquirrel42 Apr 18 '11 at 14:28

You should do:

foreach (string id in _logsDutyStatusChange.Select(x=>x.did).Distinct())
{
    string driverid = id;
}
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Might as well use Last after the Distinct and forgo the foreach –  juharr Apr 18 '11 at 14:21
3  
@juharr: I think it's reasonable to assume there's really more code than just a variable declaration within the loop body. –  Jon Skeet Apr 18 '11 at 14:23
    
Well, I was not sure if he is doing something else with the id in the loop, as I understand this is just a sample he posted. –  Andrei Apr 18 '11 at 14:24

First, create a comparer class and implement the IEqualityComparer<Log> interface:

public class LogComparer : IEqualityComparer<Log>
{
    public bool Equals(Log one, Log two)
    {
        return one.did.Equals(two.did);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Log log)
    { 
        return log.did.GetHashCode();
    }
}

And then use the overload of the Enumerable.Distinct() method that takes an instance of the equality comparer:

foreach(var log in _logsDutyStatusChange.Distinct(new LogComparer()))
{
    // Work with each distinct log here
}
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You can use Distinct if your Logs class implements IEquatable

Otherwise, a quick 'hacky' fix can be to use something like

foreach (var group in _logsDutyStatusChange.GroupBy(l => new { log.did, .... more identifying fields })
{
    string driverid = group.Key.did;
}

C# 4.0 tuples have 'automagic' comparing/equating as well

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Instead of foreach'ing _logsDutyStatusChange, you could use LINQ to get a collection of distinct and loop through those, instead:

foreach (Logs log in _logsDutyStatusChange.Select(l => l.did).Distinct())
{
    //Handling code here
}

Implementation will depend exactly on what you intend to do with the results.

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Here's one approach:

HashSet<string> SeenIDs = new HashSet<string>();

foreach (Logs log in _logsDutyStatusChange)
{
    if (SeenIDs.Contains(log.did)) break;
    SeenIDs.Add(log.did);

    string driverid = log.did;
}

Distinct() doesn't quite work here, as it will only get you the distinct dids.

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This should work (without linq):

Hashset<string> alreadyEncountered = new Hashset<string>();
foreach (Logs log in _logsDutyStatusChange)
{
    if(alreadyEncountered.Contains(log.did))
        continue;
    string driverid = log.did;
    alreadyEncountered.Add(driverid);
}
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