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Assuming the following simple code:

private const int A = 2;
private const int B = 3;


public int Result
    {
        get
        {
            return A * B;
        }
    }

I am using the Result property a lot of times.
Is the product A*B recalculated every time?

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Is your example meant to cover mulitplying constants only, or are you more after how properties work in general? As others have noted the constants will get optimized down; however, if you aren't really using constants then there are other answers... –  Chris Lively Apr 18 '11 at 15:43
    
Actually, it was both, but I didn't know there was such an important difference or I would have clarified it. Most cases I need are: 1) simple multiplication of two constants and I was wondering if there should be a private field to save the variable. 2) Long operations that are actually only needed to performed once but the compiler cannot possibly know that like in the const case. –  Alexander Karatarakis Apr 19 '11 at 12:45
    
Correcting my previous comment, this was mostly a question on constants specifically. I was unsure whether the compiler can figure out that AB is also a constant, thus obviating the need to declare another const C = AB. –  Alexander Karatarakis Apr 19 '11 at 12:57
    
In that case, you don't need a private field as the compiler will figure it out. –  Chris Lively Apr 19 '11 at 13:57
    
@Chris Lively: Awesome, thanks! –  Alexander Karatarakis Apr 19 '11 at 16:37

8 Answers 8

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Opening up the assembly in reflector, the compiler will optimize the multiplication since they are const int:

public class FooContainer
{
    private const int A = 2;
    private const int B = 3;


    public int Result
    {
        get
        {
            return A * B;
        }
    }
}

Will become:

public class FooContainer
{
    // Fields
    private const int A = 2;
    private const int B = 3;

    // Properties
    public int Result
    {
        get
        {
            return 6;
        }
    }
}

But if you change the variables to simply int and do not store the computation the evaluation will occur each time.

Example:

public class FooContainer
{
    private int A = 2;
    private const int B = 3;


    public int Result
    {
        get
        {
            return A * B;
        }
    }
}

Becomes:

public class FooContainer
{
    // Fields
    private int A = 2;
    private const int B = 3;

    // Properties
    public int Result
    {
        get
        {
            return (this.A * 3);
        }
    }
}
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A really good compiler, besides implementing the function like this, would actually replace the call site with the constant. That isn't always possible, depending on the context of the call. –  Ira Baxter Apr 18 '11 at 15:41
    
Nice, exactly what I was looking for. @Ira Baxter: Just to clarify, do you mean that a really good compiler would do this? Or does the .net/mono compiler actually do this right now as Mark demonstrated? –  Alexander Karatarakis Apr 19 '11 at 13:08
    
@Danimoth: as my answer indicated, the compiler might do this. You dont get any guarantees that optimizations you'd like to have happen, actually do happen. I'd expect it to be more likely in .net than mono, because MS has more resources and time. –  Ira Baxter Apr 19 '11 at 13:50

If you don't store the value in a private field, then yes it's going to recalculate upon every access.

A way to cache the results would be to

private int? _result;
public int Result {
  get {
     if (!_result.HasValue) {
       _result = A*B;
     }
     return _result.Value;
  }
}

There are several caveats here.

First, if all of your operations are against constants then the compiler will automatically optimize those away for you. Which means that the multiplication operation won't actually be performed at run time. Which means you shouldn't worry about it.

Second, if the operation is limited to performing a simple arithmetic operation against two existing variables, then computing it each time would be faster than the "if" test above. Also, local storage with a private field in this case would increase your memory footprint for no useful reason.

Third, if the underlying variables had changed between calls to the property getter (i.e. A or B has a new value), then this would NOT recompute with those new values.

Which leaves us with one of the few reasons to actually use the above code: The operation takes a long time and the data it operates on isn't changing between calls to the property. The only other reason I can think of at this moment to use this is if the property is an object that has to be instantiated before calling.

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1  
It is? I'd think A * B was a constant expression as it multiplies two constants, and the compiler would optimize that to 6 - or does it make exceptions for properties? –  BoltClock Apr 18 '11 at 15:34
1  
I'm assuming that was just an example to show some computation. I doubt the poster is concerned about the performance of multiplying two numbers together. –  devios Apr 18 '11 at 15:36
    
@BoltClock: AFAIK there is no exception - A * B is also constant, and its result will be calculated during compilation. –  rsenna Apr 18 '11 at 15:40
    
@BoltClock: I'd agree that the compiler would probably just optimize out multiplying two constants, but I figured the OP was just providing a quick example. –  Chris Lively Apr 18 '11 at 15:40
    
@chaiguy: The OP did specifically say "Is the product A*B recalculated every time?", so I wasn't too sure. –  BoltClock Apr 18 '11 at 15:41

Since the values are const, the compiler might optimize this situation.

But if they aren't const, it will be calculated each time.

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There's nothing magical about properties. They're just syntactic sugar over two methods, get_Xxx and set_Xxx. Knowing that, it's clear that every time a property is accessed, all code inside get part gets executed.

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Yes. However, a good rule of thumb here is that if you want an operation like this, it should be a method.

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Yes, properties are just special methods that are executed each time they are accessed. If you want to cache the results, store it in a member variable, perhaps a nullable int, and check to see if it has been calculated or not before returning it (also known as lazy initialization):

int? _result = null;
public int Result {
    get {
        if ( _result == null )
            _result = A * B;
        return _result;
    }
}
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The property is evaluated every time it's called. If you want something more efficient, you have to handle it yourself.

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Most languages don't define how optimizations work. The usual language-lawyer phrase is "as if", and in this case, the C# definition is pretty likely to say "the value of the property on each call is returned as if it were evaluated". That gives the compiler types freedom to do anything that preserves the documented behavior.

So, the compiler might optimize this. Usually, compilers with a long history and an emphasis on performance (C# has a long history and lots of resources, not quite such an emphasis on performance) try to figure out under what circumstances a previously computed result can be reused. The fact that your A and B are declared as CONSTS suggests the compiler can figure out that the product is a constant, and that in fact it could replace every call on the getter with the const.

It could. Whether it does is an open question. I doubt Microsoft will answer this question in a "yes it absolutely does this" way.

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I see. Then, to be on the safe side, maybe the best option would be to just declare a const C = A*B for cases like that. –  Alexander Karatarakis Apr 19 '11 at 13:11
    
@Danimoth: if the performance of this property matters, that might make sense. But that's a different question: does it actually matter? Before you hand-optimize this, you should verify it is problem. Otherwise you are just wasting your time and making maintenance harder for the next guy. I suspect based on experience with x86s that calling the property is more expensive than doing the arithmetic and I suspect you have less control over whether it is called or inlined, so even after your optimize the multiply, you might not have much impact. –  Ira Baxter Apr 19 '11 at 13:46
    
That is very true. I will keep it mind, thanks :) –  Alexander Karatarakis Apr 19 '11 at 16:39

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