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It's been a while since I worked with JavaScript - after my cert I began learning Perl and have worked with it ever since. I am just trying to get my hand back in and for a start with JS, I have written this what I would have said, was a simple, little script to change a border of a div quite simply. I cannot work out however, just where I'm going wrong. Appreciated of any advice/suggestion or ideas. TY in advance. Here's my script..

<script type="text/javascript">

var i =0;
var e = document.getElementById("text");

e.style.border = "solid black 5px";
e.style.padding = "5px";

var colors = ["red", "yellow", "blue", "green"];

function changeBorder()
{
    e.border = colors[i];
    i++;
    var timer = setTimeout("changeBorder()", 1000);
}

window.onload=function()
{
    changeBorder();
}

</script>



<div id="text">
   <h1>Hello world</h1>I am Mike!.
</div>
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

try this: http://jsfiddle.net/maniator/CEsJR/

<script type="text/javascript">
    var i =0;
var colors = ["red", "yellow", "blue", "green"];

function changeBorder(e)
{
    //restarts color counter
    i = i % colors.length;

    e.style.border = colors[i] + " solid 5px"
    i++;

    var timer = setTimeout(function(){changeBorder(e)}, 1000);
}

window.onload=function()
{


    var e = document.getElementById("text");

    e.style.border = "solid black 5px";
    e.style.padding = "5px";

    changeBorder(e);
}

</script>



<div id="text">
   <h1>Hello world</h1>I am Mike!.
</div>

the e variable can only be created on page load

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, why?. You mean the css info and the e var definition?. –  Mike Thornley Apr 18 '11 at 16:41
    
Yep, straight after HTML build. Thanks. –  Mike Thornley Apr 18 '11 at 16:55
    
Ol, yep no worries. I wasn't/am not quite sure how to accept answers - I listen to them all and am grateful to all without question!. Many thanks and for the heads up, Neal. –  Mike Thornley Apr 20 '11 at 11:10

You probably want:

e.style.borderColor = colors[i];

then you'll need to worry about i becoming greater than the length of colors.

Something like:

if (i >= colors.length) i=0;

is probably the way to go.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, e.style.borderColor = colors[i]; is what I did initially... but yeah, I forgot to allow for the end of the array, in that it'd have only executed once. Many thanks!. –  Mike Thornley Apr 18 '11 at 16:21

Possible Problem #1

If this is the order in which everything is run on your page, then e = document.getElementById("text") will never work. You can only get an element by its ID after it has been built by the HTML. Neal's suggestion of only getting the element on page load would work. Or, you could move your script to the bottom of the page.

Possible Problem #2

In your changeBorder function, you apply the new color like so:

e.border = colors[i];

But you probably meant to access e.style.border. And even if you did, my understanding is that border is the shortcut style, wherein you define the width, style, and color all in one rule. You'll probably want to use something like e.style.borderColor.

Possible Problem #3

It doesn't look like you're getting far enough for this to be an issue, but keep in mind that as you cycle through the different colors, eventually your i variable will be bigger than the length of the color array. To make sure that never happens, you could use the modulus operator:

e.style.borderColor = colors[i];
i = (i + 1) % 4;

Bonus

When you're only giving setTimeout a function, with no arguments, then you don't need to use quotes. The following is fine, and doesn't require the eval function:

setTimeout(changeBorder, 1000);
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant, very helpful!. Many thanks, your advice is very appreciated. –  Mike Thornley Apr 18 '11 at 16:43
    
Also, I know what the modulus operator does but that line i = (i + 1) % 4; has me a little baffled. ie: on first cycle, i which is 0=(0+1)divided by 4 and remaineder, assigned to i. I just don't see that bit at all and how that works. –  Mike Thornley Apr 18 '11 at 16:51
1  
@Mike If you do 1 % 4 in JavaScript, you get 1 -- same as if you did 5 % 4 –  sdleihssirhc Apr 18 '11 at 18:59
    
Yup, I checked by setting up notification and saw what that line did. many thanks!. –  Mike Thornley Apr 18 '11 at 19:12

Here's an example. In setTimeout, you can just use a pointer to the function you want to execute. I've included a mechanism to restart the color switch after i = 4.

share|improve this answer
    
@Kooilnc in your example you dont leave room for more than 4 colors –  Neal Apr 18 '11 at 16:07
    
@Neal: well I don't think I have to write the complete script for the OP. It's just to demonstrate how his snippet could work. –  KooiInc Apr 18 '11 at 18:30

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