Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a set of numbers from 0 to 1. Given a value X in the set, I'd like to find the range values (high and low) where Y% of the values in the set are within high and low and where X is the mid point.

So let's say the numbers are evenly distributed. Given X=0.4 and Y=20%, I need a function that will give me:

high = 0.5 low = 0.3

How can I do that in R?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Update: In light of the extra info from the comments, this will do what the OP wants:

foobar <- function(x, mid, y) {
    ## x, input data on range 0,1
    ## mid, midpoint X in OP's Q
    ## y, % of points around mid
    sx <- sort(x)
    want <- sx >= mid
    ## what do you want to do if y% of x is not integer?
    num <- floor(((y/100) * length(x)) / 2)
    high <- if((len <- length(want[want])) == 0) {
        1
    } else {
        if(len < num) {
            tail(sx, 1)
        } else {
            sx[want][num]
        }
    }
    low <- if((len <- length(want[!want])) == 0) {
        0
    } else {
        if(len < num) {
            head(sx, 1)
        } else {
            rev(sx[!want])[num]
        }
    }
    res <- c(low, high)
    names(res) <- c("low","high")
    res
}

Which gives the following on a sample of random values on interval 0,1:

> set.seed(1)
> x <- runif(20)
> sort(x)
 [1] 0.06178627 0.17655675 0.20168193 0.20597457 0.26550866 0.37212390
 [7] 0.38003518 0.38410372 0.49769924 0.57285336 0.62911404 0.66079779
[13] 0.68702285 0.71761851 0.76984142 0.77744522 0.89838968 0.90820779
[19] 0.94467527 0.99190609
> foobar(x, 0.4, 20)
      low      high 
0.3800352 0.5728534

The OP has answered the Qs below and the version of the function above does as was requested and in light of comments.

There are a couple of issues to deal with:

  • What do you want to do if y% of the data is not an integer? At the moment, if y% of the data evaluates to say 4.2 I am rounding down to floor(4.2) but we could round up to ceiling(4.2).
  • What do you want to do if there are 0 values above or below the chosen mid point? At the moment the code returns the stated extremes (0,1) in those cases.
  • What do you want to do if there are some values above/below the mid point but not enough in a given direction to encompass y/2% in any one direction? At the moment I return the extreme points of the data that lie above/below the mid point. This is a little inconsistent with the previous point though, should we return the extremes 0, 1 in this case too?

Original: This will give you what you want, assuming the assumptions you state (evenly distributed on range 0,1)

foo <- function(x, y) {
    ## x is the mid-point
    ## y is the % range about x, i.e. y/2 either side of x
    x + (c(-1,1) * (((y/100) / 2) * 1))
}

> foo(0.4, 20)
[1] 0.3 0.5

We could extend the function to allow an arbitrary range with defaults 0, 1:

bar <- function(x, y, min = 0, max = 1) {
    ## x is the mid-point
    ## y is the % range about x, i.e. y/2 either side of x
    ## min, max, the lower and upper bounds on the data
    stopifnot(x >= min & x <= max)
    x + (c(-1,1) * (((y/100) / 2) * (max - min)))
}

> bar(0.4, 20)
[1] 0.3 0.5
> bar(0.6, 20, 0.5, 1)
[1] 0.55 0.65
> bar(0.4, 20, 0.5, 1)
Error: x >= min & x <= max is not TRUE
share|improve this answer
    
I was just using the assumption of even distribution to make the example clearer. I'll need to use the function on sets that aren't necessarily evenly distributed. –  Dave Apr 18 '11 at 16:13
    
@Dave Ah, well that is an important disctinction - you mean you want to work out which values are within +/- Y/2% of X and then give the limits? I think that should be easily doable with quantiles. Give me a minute... –  Gavin Simpson Apr 18 '11 at 16:19
    
@Dave I think I have it now - see my updated Answer. There are several (3) implementation details that need clarifying as I made a guess at something reasonable but that might not be what you wanted. See the Q's at end of my update. –  Gavin Simpson Apr 18 '11 at 16:53
    
@Gavin Wow - great answer! I think I'd want y/2% at most on either side of mid. So if mid = max then just then high = max and low = y/2% below mid. y will never not be an integer. –  Dave Apr 18 '11 at 17:16
    
@Dave OK, that sort of answers my Q2. What about my Q3? mid != max but there aren't y/2% observations greater than mid? Do you still want it to return max (i.e. 1) in that case? Currently I return the largest value above the mid point. Easy to fix, just need to know what you want? And what about my Q1? –  Gavin Simpson Apr 18 '11 at 17:20

Here is a rather briefer form

interval <- function(data, centre, qrange, type=1) {  #type as in ?quantile
    qcentre <- ( length(data[data<centre]) +          #quantile of centre
                 length(data[data == centre])/2 ) / length(data)
    quantile(data, c( max(0, qcentre-qrange/2), qcentre, 
                      min(1, qcentre+qrange/2) ), type=type )  
   } 

An illustration showing the quantile of the point at or nearest below the specified centre, and the low and high quantiles as well as their values:

> set.seed(42)
> interval(data=runif(1000000), centre=0.4, qrange=0.2)
 29.9793%  39.9793%  49.9793% 
0.3003162 0.3999986 0.5001484 

An illustration that extremes and non-uniform distributions can be handled; note that sqrt(0.95) = 0.974679...:

> set.seed(123)
> interval(data=runif(100000)^2, centre=0.95, qrange=0.2)
  87.456%   97.456%      100% 
0.7634248 0.9499948 0.9999846 

And an illustration reproducing Gavin Simpson's example:

> set.seed(1)
> interval(data=runif(20), centre=0.4, qrange=0.2)
      30%       40%       50% 
0.3800352 0.3841037 0.5728534 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.