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for a certain project I have declared an interface (a class with only pure virtual functions) and want to offer users some implementations of this interface.

I want users to have great flexibility, so I offer partial implementations of this interface. In every implementation there is some functionality included, other functions are not overridden since they take care about different parts.

However, I also want to present users with a fully usable implementation of the interface as well. So my first approach was to simply derive a class from both partial implementations. This did not work and exited with the error that some functions are still pure virtual in the derived class.

So my question is if there is any way to simply merge two partial implementations of the same interface. I found a workaround by explicitely stating which function I want to be called for each method, but I consider this pretty ugly and would be grateful for an mechanism taking care of this for me.

#include <iostream>

class A{
    public:
        virtual void foo() = 0;
        virtual void bar() = 0;
};

class B: public A{
    public:
        void foo(){ std::cout << "Foo from B" << std::endl; }
};

class C: public A{
    public:
        void bar(){ std::cout << "Bar from C" << std::endl; }
};

// Does not work
class D: public B, public C {};

// Does work, but is ugly
class D: public B, public C {
    public:
        void foo(){ B::foo(); }
        void bar(){ C::bar(); }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv){
    D d;
    d.foo();
    d.bar();
}

Regards, Alexander


The actual problem is about managing several visitors for a tree, letting each of them traverse the tree, make a decision for each of the nodes and then aggregate each visitor's decision and accumulate it into a definite decision.

A separation of both parts is sadly not possible without (I think) massive overhead, since I want to provide one implementation taking care of managing the visitors and one taking care of how to store the final decision.

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I think the using keyword will be a little less "ugly" than what you have, but it doesn't answer your question. –  arasmussen Apr 18 '11 at 18:18
    
So how exactly should I use the using keyword? It would spare me the B:: and C::, but I still would have to write something along the lines of void foo(){foo();} and void bar(){bar();} –  aweinert Apr 19 '11 at 11:54

5 Answers 5

Have you considered avoiding the diamond inheritance completely, providing several abstract classes each with optional implementations, allowing the user to mix and match default implementation and interface as needed?

In your case what's happening is that once you inherit to D, B::bar hasn't been implemented and C::foo hasn't been implemented. The intermediate classes B and C aren't able to see each others' implementations.

If you need the full interface in the grandparent, have you considered providing the implementation in a different way, possibly a policy with templates, and default classes that will be dispatched into to provide the default behavior?

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Thanks for your ideas, but as I have (now) specified above splitting the interface is sadly not possible without massive overhead. Could you provide some more information or a link on how to provide the implementation using templates? –  aweinert Apr 19 '11 at 12:09

If your top level interface has a logical division in functionality, you should split it into two separate interfaces. For example if you have both serialization and drawing functions in interface A, you should separate these into two interfaces, ISerialization and IDrawing.

You're free to then provide a default implementation of each of these interfaces. The user of your classes can inherit either your interface or your default implementation as needed.

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Thanks, but separation is not possible in this specific problem. I have added some more information about the actual problem above. –  aweinert Apr 19 '11 at 12:04

There is also the possibility that you could use a "factory" class for the main interface type. In other words the primary interface class also contains some type of static function that generates an appropriate child class on-request from the user. For instance:

#include <cstdio>

class A 
{
    public:
       enum class_t { CLASS_B, CLASS_C };

       static A* make_a_class(class_t type);

       virtual void foo() = 0;
       virtual void bar() = 0;
};

class B: public A
{
    private:
        virtual void foo() { /* does nothing */ }

    public:
        virtual void bar() { printf("Called B::bar()\n"); }
};

class C: public A
{
    private:
        virtual void bar() { /* does nothing */ }

    public:
        virtual void foo() { printf("Called C::foo()\n"); }
};

A* A::make_a_class(class_t type)
{
   switch(type)
   {
       case CLASS_B: return new B();
       case CLASS_C: return new C();
       default: return NULL;
    }
}

int main()
{
    B* Class_B_Obj = static_cast<B*>(A::make_a_class(A::CLASS_B));
    C* Class_C_Obj = static_cast<C*>(A::make_a_class(A::CLASS_C));

    //Class_B_Obj->foo(); //can't access since it's private
    Class_B_Obj->bar();

    Class_C_Obj->foo();
    //Class_C_Obj->bar(); //can't access since it's private

    return 0;
}

If class A for some reason needs to access some private members of class B or class C, just make class A a friend of the children classes (for instance, you could make the constructors of class B and class C private constructors so that only the static function in class A can generate them, and the user can't make one on their own without calling the static factory function in class A).

Hope this helps,

Jason

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Correct me if I am wrong, but this would not actually solve the task of merging the implementations in B and C, would it? That way I would only be able to instantiate the partial implementations. That would be exactly what I was trying to avoid. –  aweinert Apr 19 '11 at 12:17
    
Well, it could, you would have to make a class D with an associated CLASS_D enum that would represent your composite class. This composite class would probably have to use the diamond-shaped inheritance structure you showed in your first post, but at least you would be presenting a unified interface for object creation to the end-user. Furthermore, depending on the implementation, they won't have to worry about the details of exactly what type of class they get, rather they'll get a class that has a consistent interface across all the returned types from the single factory function. –  Jason Apr 19 '11 at 13:58
    
Quick question, do you only need to call functions from a merged interface, or are there shared data-elements as well that require the multiple-inheritance method you're describing above? –  Jason Apr 20 '11 at 0:38
    
Nope, I only need the functions. Each partial specialization uses some member data, that does not need to be accessible by D. –  aweinert Apr 20 '11 at 7:29
    
Okay, I'm going to add another answer below then that could maybe solve your problem using templates. –  Jason Apr 20 '11 at 16:06

Since you mentioned that you mainly needed access to the functions rather than data-members, here is another method you could use rather than multiple inheritance using templates and template partial specialization:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

enum class_t { CLASS_A, CLASS_B, CLASS_C };

template<class_t class_type>
class base_type
{
    public:
            static void foo() {}
            static void bar() {}
};

template<>
void base_type<CLASS_A>::foo() { cout << "Calling CLASS_A type foo()" << endl; }

template<>
void base_type<CLASS_B>::bar() { cout << "Calling CLASS_B type bar()" << endl; }

template<>
void base_type<CLASS_C>::foo() { base_type<CLASS_A>::foo(); }

template<>
void base_type<CLASS_C>::bar() { base_type<CLASS_B>::bar(); }

int main()
{
    base_type<CLASS_A> Class_A;
    Class_A.foo();

    base_type<CLASS_B> Class_B;
    Class_B.bar();

    base_type<CLASS_C> Class_C;
    Class_C.foo();
    Class_C.bar();

    return 0;
}

Now if you need non-static functions that have access to private data-members, this can get a bit trickier, but it should still be doable. It would though most likely require the need for a separate traits class you can use to access the proper types without running into "incomplete types" compiler errors.

Thanks,

Jason

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I think the problem is that when using simple inheritance between B and A, and between C and A, you end up with two objects of type A in D (each of which will have a pure virtual function, causing a compile error because D is thus abstract and you try to create an instance of it).

Using virtual inheritance solves the problem since it ensure there is only one copy of A in D.

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