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If I have a read-only property on an object that fills itself via the DB, is this what I should be doing, or is there a better way to make sure it's already been evaluated?

private List<Variable> _selectedVariables;
public new List<Variable> SelectedVariables
{
    get
    {
        if (_selectedVariables == null)
        {
            _selectedVariables = SomeFunctionThatCallsDB();
        }
        return _selectedVariables;
    }
}
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1  
Most people call that lazy loading. It's pretty common. –  dotjoe Apr 18 '11 at 18:20
    
This is the best article that I have read about the Singleton pattern in C# and thread safety: C# in Depth: Implementing the Singleton Pattern in C# –  pickypg Apr 18 '11 at 18:32
    
@pickypg my class isn't a static class though. does that article still apply? –  Jason Apr 18 '11 at 18:43
    
Not all of it. A lot deals with Singleton's in particular. The one that is probably most interesting to you is the System.Lazy Initialization. That's number 6 from the previous link. –  pickypg Apr 18 '11 at 18:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's fine for a single thread; but you will have problems if that is going to be in a situation where you have multithreaded gets.

EDIT: Threadsafing:

Simple Threadsafe pattern:

private readonly object _objectLock = new object();
private List<T> _someList = null;

public List<T> MyStuff
{
    get
    {
         if(_someList == null)
         {
             lock(_objectLock)
             {
                  if(_someList == null)
                     _someList = LoadFromDB();
             }
         }

         return _someList;
    }
}

You check to see if set, then lock, then check again to make sure you covered the race condition.

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how do i make it threadsafe then? –  Jason Apr 18 '11 at 18:19
    
@Jason, Added Edit to provide a sample. –  Tejs Apr 18 '11 at 18:23
    
thanks so much –  Jason Apr 18 '11 at 18:25
    
@glowcoder, I'm not sure I understand. The check is both outside and inside the lock. –  Tejs Apr 18 '11 at 18:28

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