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Why is it that the Number Class provides abstract methods for conversion methods for Double, Int, Long, and Float but not abstract methods for byte and short?

Overall I am slightly confused on when to use Abstract methods, as I just began learning Java.

Thanks for any insight anyone can offer.

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One look at the source for them says why:

public byte byteValue() {
    return (byte)intValue();
}

public short shortValue() {
    return (short)intValue();
}

They both rely on the fact that intValue() will be defined, and just use whatever they provide for that.

This makes me wonder why they don't just make

public int intValue() {
    return (int)longValue();
}

Since the same rule applies.

Note that there's nothing that says you can't override these methods anyway. They don't have to be abstract for you to override them.

Results on my machine:

C:\Documents and Settings\glow\My Documents>java SizeTest
int: 45069467
short: 45069467
byte: 90443706
long: 11303499

C:\Documents and Settings\glow\My Documents>

Class:

class SizeTest {

    /**
     * For each primitive type int, short, byte and long,
     * attempt to make an array as large as you can until
     * running out of memory. Start with an array of 10000,
     * and increase capacity by 1% until it throws an error.
     * Catch the error and print the size.
     */    
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int len = 10000;
        final double inc = 1.01;
        try {
            while(true) {
                len = (int)(len * inc);
                int[] arr = new int[len];
            }
        } catch(Throwable t) {
            System.out.println("int: " + len);
        }

        len = 10000;
        try {
            while(true) {
                len = (int)(len * inc);
                short[] arr = new short[len];
            }
        } catch(Throwable t) {
            System.out.println("short: " + len);
        }


        len = 10000;
        try {
            while(true) {
                len = (int)(len * inc);
                byte[] arr = new byte[len];
            }
        } catch(Throwable t) {
            System.out.println("byte: " + len);
        }

        len = 10000;
        try {
            while(true) {
                len = (int)(len * inc);
                long[] arr = new long[len];
            }
        } catch(Throwable t) {
            System.out.println("long: " + len);
        }
    }
}
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Thanks, this helps. This is probably a dumb question but how exactly do you view source code for the Java API? –  Kevin Apr 18 '11 at 19:05
    
The Number class dates back to Java 1.1, so I wouldn't assume that they had a very clear idea of what they wanted. But remember that in Java, longs and ints behave differently, while bytes, shorts are still processed in 32 bit space. –  Dilum Ranatunga Apr 18 '11 at 19:10
    
@Kevin, re: source code for Java -- I'm a big fan of using jdocs.com. For example, jdocs.com/harmony/5.M5/java/lang/Number.html –  Dilum Ranatunga Apr 18 '11 at 19:16
    
@Kevin if you download the jdk, it often comes with a src.zip with the JDK source. –  corsiKa Apr 18 '11 at 19:19
    
@ Dilum; Ah thanks for that link. I thought that ints and floats were also 32-bit, so what do you mean by behaving differently? @glowcoder - thanks as well! –  Kevin Apr 18 '11 at 19:19
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