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I created a dll file. This file is compiled as C code. I want to use this dll file in a new project. This new project is a C++ project. If I compile my new project, everything is fine but when the project is compiled as a C++ program, it gives unresolved external symbol error for the functions exported from dll file. I want my new project to be a C++ program but want to link a library compiled as a C program. I am using Visual Studio 2010. Any help?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Another aproach is to change the C header file to check if is being compiled by a cpp compiler and include the extern "C" conditionally:

#ifdef __cplusplus 
extern "C" {
#endif

void func1(int a, int b);
//... other functions

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif
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You need to use extern "C" in your header file declarations of the imported procedures so that C linkage is used.

At the moment what is happening is that the C++ compiler is expecting mangled names for your imported functions. Using extern "C" switches off the C++ name mangling.

For example:

extern "C"
{
    int Func1(int a, int b);
    void Func2(double a);
}

Since you have control over the header file it makes more sense to place the extern "C" in the header file. This means that anyone that consumes your header file does not need to concern themselves with such issues. However, when including header files over which you do not have control, then @Nawaz's suggestion is a slick way to to it.

I also forgot to mention that excellent point that @bcsanches makes which is that extern "C" is C++ rather than C. Thus it needs to be included conditionally if you want a single header file to work for both C and C++.

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Thanks but it gives a strange error : error C2059: syntax error : 'string'. –  delete_this_account Apr 18 '11 at 19:00
    
@goygoycu You can't use C++ data types in C libraries, I assume something like that is being attempted here. –  Mark B Apr 18 '11 at 19:01
1  
@goygoycu The example I give is correct. I'm not sure about your error because I can't see your code. –  David Heffernan Apr 18 '11 at 19:01
    
I am not using any C++ datatypes in C. If I write extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) int raxml_main(int argc, char* argv[]); it gives that error. –  delete_this_account Apr 18 '11 at 20:44
    
@goygoycu You added it to the C code. extern "C" is C++. You don't need to specify C linkage in C code. Add it to the header file that you use to import it into your C++ code. Use the #ifdef that bcsanches shows. –  David Heffernan Apr 18 '11 at 20:48

Do this when adding C header to C++ project:

extern "C"
{
   #include "cheader.h" //C header 
}

This prevents C++ compiler from doing name-mangling for names defined in cheader.h

You can even define a namespace as:

namespace cproject
{
    extern "C"
    {
       #include "cheader.h" //C header 
    }    
}

If you do so, then you've to qualify each name (functions, variables, structs) with cproject:: when you refer to names defined in cheader.h.

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@Downvoter: Please specify the reason. –  Nawaz Apr 18 '11 at 19:10
    
It wasn't me. I think you should say something about how to manage such includes, namely that the two excerpts you present would need themselves to be in a header file. –  David Heffernan Apr 18 '11 at 19:12
    
@David: Explaining that would take time and energy. And I'm already tired and feeling sleepy. Its 12:44 AM in India. :-) –  Nawaz Apr 18 '11 at 19:14

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