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I am currently moving from C to Objective-C and, to me, this code seems to be all find a dandy but Xcode thinks otherwise. I got this code sample from the internet and have been relentlessly trying to correct it and I've come to a deadend:

#include <objc/Object.h>

@interface Greeter:Object
{
    /* This is left empty on purpose:
     ** Normally instance variables would be declared here,
     ** but these are not used in our example.
     */
}

- (void)greet;

@end

#include <stdio.h>

@implementation Greeter

- (void)greet
{
    printf("Hello, World!\n");
}

@end

#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{

    id myGreeter;
    myGreeter = [Greeter new];

    [myGreeter greet];

    [myGreeter release];
    return 0;
}

The error seems to be on the myGreeter = [Greeter new]; line and the Xcode isolates the problem as something about Thread 1. Do I need to alloc/init anything?

Below is the console log:

[Switching to process 1833 thread 0x0]
2011-04-18 21:52:10.323 PROJ[1833:903] *** NSInvocation: warning: object 0x100001160 of class 'Greeter' does not implement methodSignatureForSelector: -- trouble ahead
2011-04-18 21:52:10.326 PROJ[1833:903] *** NSInvocation: warning: object 0x100001160 of class 'Greeter' does not implement doesNotRecognizeSelector: -- abort
sharedlibrary apply-load-rules all
Current language:  auto; currently objective-c
(gdb) 
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I'm not much of an expert either, but why aren't you say Greeter myGreeter = [Greeter new]? I don't believe "id" will know about any of your methods, even if you could assign a greeter to it. –  Marvo Apr 18 '11 at 20:29
    
new and alloc-init can be used interchangeably. Can you post the console log of what XCode says? –  Tejaswi Yerukalapudi Apr 18 '11 at 20:34
    
@Marvo it will be fine, you don't get warnings when calling methods of id because if it gave warnings it would always do so and that's annoying. It will figure out what your object is at runtime and find your method then –  Nektarios Apr 18 '11 at 20:46
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your class, Greeter, inherits from the Objective-C Object class. In Cocoa, the root class is (generally) NSObject, and you should inherit from that. This may fix your problem.

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Greeter:Object should be Greeter:NSObject, "Object" is not an objective-c class.

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1  
It's actually an old Objective-C class, from the original spec. I tried compiling using this import, but it seems it's not compiled for modern Mac's. Edit: ah, I guess it's the runtime that was the problem, as per post from epatel. –  Wolfgang Schreurs Apr 18 '11 at 21:04
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Is this not just the Xcode debugger halting on the default breakpoint in "main" ? Simply click continue (or similar in the Run menu) and you should be golden.

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Maybe I am wrong, but I always thought you allocated in Objective - C like this

id myGreeter;
myGreeter= [[myGreeter alloc] init];
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1  
new is a method that basically blends alloc/init together into one method. It had pretty much fallen into disuse by the time OS X came along, but I think some Objective-C book or another used it (for some reason) so programmers who picked up Objective-C recently seem to be using it. –  mipadi Apr 18 '11 at 20:44
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Actually using new is, sort of, shorthand for the alloc/init, as you can read about here

HOWEVER, you're using objective-c outside of Cocoa it appears, because you're inheriting from Object and not NSObject and so on. So I think you should explicitly use myGreeter = [[myGreeter alloc] init];

Also since you say Xcode, you should be using Cocoa. Try:

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>

And then also switch Object to NSObject

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Your example uses the GNU runtime and thus is a bit deprecated. The compiler defaults to the NeXT runtime but can be set to use the GNU runtime with the compile option -fgnu-runtime

You should look into grabbing a good book about Objective-C like "Programming in Objective-C" by Stephen Kochan

http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Objective-C-Stephen-Kochan/dp/0672325861

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