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I'm working with the .NET framework and I really want to be able to make a custom type of page that all of my website uses. The problem comes when I am trying to access the page from a control. I want to be able to return my specific type of page instead of the default page. Is there any way to do this?

public class MyPage : Page
{
// My own logic
}

public class MyControl : Control
{
    public MyPage Page {get; set;}
}
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possible duplicate of c# covariant return types utilizing generics –  nawfal Jul 10 at 6:28

7 Answers 7

up vote 64 down vote accepted

It sounds like what you want is return type covariance. C# does not support return type covariance.

Return type covariance is where you override a base class method that returns a less-specific type with one that returns a more specific type:

abstract class Enclosure
{
    public abstract Animal Contents();
}
class Aquarium : Enclosure
{
    public override Fish Contents() { ... }
}

This is safe because consumers of Contents via Enclosure expect an Animal, and Aquarium promises to not only fulfill that requirement, but moreover, to make a more strict promise: that the animal is always a fish.

This kind of covariance is not supported in C#, and is unlikely to ever be supported. It is not supported by the CLR. (It is supported by C++, and by the C++/CLI implementation on the CLR; it does so by generating magical helper methods of the sort I suggest below.)

(Some languages support formal parameter type contravariance as well -- that you can override a method that takes a Fish with a method that takes an Animal. Again, the contract is fulfilled; the base class requires that any Fish be handled, and the derived class promises to not only handle fish, but any animal. Similarly, C# and the CLR do not support formal parameter type contravariance.)

The way you can work around this limitation is to do something like:

abstract class Enclosure
{
    protected abstract Animal GetContents();
    public Animal Contents() { return this.GetContents(); }
}
class Aquarium : Enclosure
{
    protected override Animal GetContents() { return this.Contents(); }
    public new Fish Contents() { ... }
}

Now you get both the benefits of overriding a virtual method, and getting stronger typing when using something of compile-time type Aquarium.

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1  
Perfect! I forgot about hiding! –  Kyle Apr 18 '11 at 21:38
    
Keep in mind, since System.Web.UI.Page is not an abstract class, you'll need to use the new operator instead of override. –  Zhais Apr 18 '11 at 21:41
3  
good answer as always. We were missing those answers for a while. –  Dhananjay Jul 20 '12 at 13:32
4  
@EricLippert Being a C# groupie, I'm always curious about the "backstage", so I just have to ask: Was return type covariance ever considered for C# and deemed to have a too low ROI? I understand time and bugdet constraints, but from your "unlikely to ever be supported" statement it sounds like the design team would actually rather NOT have this in the language. On the other side of the fence, Java introduced this language feature in Java 5, so I wonder what's the difference is in the greater, overarching principles that govern the language design process. –  Cristi Diaconescu Nov 20 '12 at 10:14
1  
@CristiDiaconescu: also: stackoverflow.com/a/7996843/10311, so there are versioning issues involved –  Porges Nov 21 '12 at 0:23

Placing this in the MyControl object would work:

 public new MyPage Page {get return (MyPage)Page; set;}'

You can't override the property because it returns a different type... but you can redefine it.

You don't need covariance in this example, since it is relatively simple. All you're doing is inheriting the base object Page from MyPage. Any Control that you want to return MyPage instead of Page needs to redefine the Page property of the Control

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I haven't tried it, but doesn't this work?

YourPageType myPage = (YourPageType)yourControl.Page;
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1  
Yeah, it does. I just want to try and avoid casting all over the place. –  Kyle Apr 18 '11 at 21:28

Yes. There are multiple ways of doing this, and this is just one option:

You can make your page implement some custom interface that exposes a method called "GetContext" or something, and it returns your specific information. Then your control can simply request the page and cast:

var myContextPage = this.Page as IMyContextGetter;

if(myContextPage != null)
   var myContext = myContextPage.GetContext();

Then you can use that context however you wish.

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Yes, it supports covariance, but it depends upon the exact thing you are trying to achieve.

I also tend to use generics a lot for things, which means that when you do something like:

class X<T> {
    T doSomething() {
    }

}

class Y : X<Y> {
    Y doSomethingElse() {
    }
}

var Y y = new Y();
y = y.doSomething().doSomethingElse();

And not "lose" your types.

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You can access your page from any control by walking up the parent tree. That is

myParent = this;

while(myParent.parent != null)
  myParent = myParent.parent;

*Did not compile or test.

Or get the parent page in the current context (depends on your version).


Then what I like to do is this: I create an interface with the functions I want to use in the control (for example IHostingPage)

Then I cast the parent page 'IHostingPage host = (IHostingPage)Parent;' and I am all set to call the function on the page I need from my control.

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This blog post series discusses the issue of return type covariance in detail, even talking about how to do it with IL.

http://www.simple-talk.com/community/blogs/simonc/archive/2010/07/14/93495.aspx

http://www.simple-talk.com/community/blogs/simonc/archive/2010/07/16/93516.aspx

http://www.simple-talk.com/community/blogs/simonc/archive/2010/07/19/93562.aspx

Sorry for just posting links, but it is quite detailed and quoting snippets here would not be that helpful. It shows how it can be achieved using IL code.

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