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I need to debug a web application that uses jQuery to do some fairly complex and messy DOM manipulation. At one point, some of the events that were bound to particular elements, are not fired and simply stop working.

If I had a capability to edit the application source, I would drill down and add a bunch of Firebug console.log() statements and comment/uncomment pieces of code to try to pinpoint the problem. But let's assume I cannot edit the application code and need to work entirely in Firefox using Firebug or similar tools.

Firebug is very good at letting me navigate and manipulate the DOM. So far, though, I have not been able to figure out how to do event debugging with Firebug. Specifically, I just want to see a list of event handlers bound to a particular element at a given time (using Firebug JavaScript breakpoints to trace the changes). But either Firebug does not have the capability to see bound events, or I'm too dumb to find it. :-)

Any recommendations or ideas? Ideally, I would just like to see and edit events bound to elements, similarly to how I can edit DOM today.

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17 Answers 17

up vote 291 down vote accepted

See How to find event listeners on a DOM node.

In a nutshell, assuming at some point an event handler is attached to your element (eg): $('#foo').click(function() { console.log('clicked!') });

You inspect it like so:

  • jQuery 1.3.x

    var clickEvents = $('#foo').data("events").click;
    jQuery.each(clickEvents, function(key, value) {
      console.log(value) // prints "function() { console.log('clicked!') }"
    })
    
  • jQuery 1.4.x

    var clickEvents = $('#foo').data("events").click;
    jQuery.each(clickEvents, function(key, handlerObj) {
      console.log(handlerObj.handler) // prints "function() { console.log('clicked!') }"
    })
    

See jQuery.fn.data (where jQuery stores your handler internally).

  • jQuery 1.8.x

    var clickEvents = $._data($('#foo')[0], "events").click;
    jQuery.each(clickEvents, function(key, handlerObj) {
      console.log(handlerObj.handler) // prints "function() { console.log('clicked!') }"
    })
    
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209  
alert() is bad bad bad for debugging. It's a horrorshow for asynchronous events and trecherous in animation or mouseevent stuff. console.log() always gives more information, it's formatted nicely and its non-modal. Always use console.log, die alert die. –  Paul Irish Dec 20 '10 at 0:09
4  
How would this look like for jQuery 1.6? –  Gezim Sep 15 '11 at 14:05
13  
FYI: This will not display events that weren't attached with jQuery –  Juan Mendes Oct 7 '11 at 18:39
6  
Totally agree about console.log(), however it should be hedged with something like if (window.console) in case it gets left in the code (much easier to do than with alert()) and breaks IE. –  thepeer Jan 24 '12 at 16:46
10  
@thepeer Personally I prefer to do a check for the console at the start of the file, and if it doesn't exist create a dummy object. –  Andrew Feb 4 '12 at 13:15

There's a nice bookmarklet called Visual Event that can show you all the events attached to an element. It has color-coded highlights for different types of events (mouse, keyboard, etc.). When you hover over them, it shows the body of the event handler, how it was attached, and the file/line number (on WebKit and Opera). You can also trigger the event manually.

It can't find every event because there's no standard way to look up what event handlers are attached to an element, but it works with popular libraries like jQuery, Prototype, MooTools, YUI, etc.

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Thanks! This is almost there, but for some (more problematic) elements, it shows the handler is just { return false; } even if a handler actually exists. –  Jaanus Feb 20 '09 at 20:35
1  
This bookmarklet seems to have stopped working and their website is down :-(. It seems that the bookmarklet calls a Javascript file that was on their site –  Casebash Jul 18 '10 at 23:19
4  
@Casebash: It's working again. –  Matthew Crumley Jul 21 '10 at 3:22
4  
Note that since this runs in content JavaScript, it gets its data by querying JavaScript libraries. So it will only show events added with a supported library (which includes jQuery). –  Matthew Flaschen Sep 25 '11 at 4:57
1  
When I tried to use Visual Event on my page, I got a JavaScript error somewhere in their script, and then nothing happened. Results my vary, but this didn't work for me. –  Josh Mouch Oct 27 '11 at 18:05

The Eventbug extension has been released yesterday, see: http://www.softwareishard.com/blog/firebug/eventbug-alpha-released/

Honza

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Integrates great in Firebug. Thanks for the suggestion! –  Husky Sep 29 '10 at 9:11
    
Jan thank you! No, really! –  Mr. L Feb 11 '11 at 16:48
    
+1 This answer should get more votes, to vie for top position. It provides a Firebug way to solve the issue, which (like the author seems to prefer) is the reason I got to this page. –  user66001 Jan 24 at 18:33
    
This seems like an interesting feature. Is it gone? I can't find how to install Eventbug. I've been to the link given above, but I don't understand how to download/install this addon into Firebug. Thanks. –  Chris22 Mar 7 at 19:17
    
Eventbug appears to be included in Firebug 2(.0.2) by default now - just right click an element to inspect it, then look for the 'Events' inspector panel (as demonstrated in this image blog.getfirebug.com/2014/06/10/firebug-2-0/…) –  Matty J Aug 11 at 5:46

You could use FireQuery. It shows any events attached to DOM elements in the Firebug's HTML tab. It also shows any data attached to the elements through $.data.

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That plugin has 1 really big downside: When you are debugging, and you want to inspect the value of a variable which contains a jquery collection you are not able to inspect the value when your code is paused. This is not the cause with firebug. The reason for me to uninstall it. alone –  BlackHawkDesign Apr 16 '12 at 12:11
    
+1 This answer should get more votes, to vie for top position. It provides a Firebug way to solve the issue, which (like the author seems to prefer) is the reason I got to this page. –  user66001 Jan 24 at 18:34
    
FireQuery doesn't seem to show attached events anymore :( –  Matty J Aug 11 at 5:32

Here's a plugin which can list all event handlers for any given element/event:

$.fn.listHandlers = function(events, outputFunction) {
    return this.each(function(i){
        var elem = this,
            dEvents = $(this).data('events');
        if (!dEvents) {return;}
        $.each(dEvents, function(name, handler){
            if((new RegExp('^(' + (events === '*' ? '.+' : events.replace(',','|').replace(/^on/i,'')) + ')$' ,'i')).test(name)) {
               $.each(handler, function(i,handler){
                   outputFunction(elem, '\n' + i + ': [' + name + '] : ' + handler );
               });
           }
        });
    });
};

Use it like this:

// List all onclick handlers of all anchor elements:
$('a').listHandlers('onclick', console.info);

// List all handlers for all events of all elements:
$('*').listHandlers('*', console.info);

// Write a custom output function:
$('#whatever').listHandlers('click',function(element,data){
    $('body').prepend('<br />' + element.nodeName + ': <br /><pre>' + data + '<\/pre>');
});

Src: (my blog) -> http://james.padolsey.com/javascript/debug-jquery-events-with-listhandlers/

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The WebKit Developer Console (found in Chrome, Safari, etc.) lets you view attached events for elements.

More detail in this Stack Overflow question

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Use $._data(htmlElement, "events") in jquery 1.7+;

ex:

$._data(document, "events") or $._data($('.class_name').get(0), "events")

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As a colleague suggested, console.log > alert:

var clickEvents = $('#foo').data("events").click;
jQuery.each(clickEvents, function(key, value) {
    console.log(value);
})
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Hope this will help somebody. Splinetech javascript debugger is what I've been using for years to debug jquery.

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jQuery stores events in the following:

$("a#somefoo").data("events")

Doing a console.log($("a#somefoo").data("events")) should list the events attached to that element.

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Looks like FireBug crew is working on an EventBug extension. It will add another panel to FireBug - Events.

"The events panel will list all of the event handlers on the page grouped by event type. For each event type you can open up to see the elements the listeners are bound to and summary of the function source." EventBug Rising

Although they cannot say right now when it will be released.

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1  
This feature was released and included into FireBug 2.0.1. Now when you inspect a HTML element on a page, there is a new "Events" panel where you can see attached events and their handlers. –  derloopkat Aug 9 at 17:50

There are a few very good tools for debugging jquery running as Firefox plugins. I wrote an article about this on my blog at http://johnayling.com/programming-tips/debugging-jquery-code.

If you look halfway down the article I show you how to use firefinder to debug jquery events.

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2  
You might consider summarizing the relevant bits of your blog posting for the benefit of those reading the answers here. It's fine to include a link to your blog for more context or detail. But a direct answer is always appreciated, and based on your link you have a good bit to share here. –  GargantuChet Jul 5 '11 at 4:35

Using DevTools in the latest Chrome (v29) I find these two tips very helpful for debugging events:

  1. Listing jQuery events of the last selected DOM element

    • Inspect an element on the page
    • type the following in the console:

      $._data($0, "events") //assuming jQuery 1.7+

    • It will list all jQuery event objects associated with it, expand the interested event, right-click on the function of the "handler" property and choose "Show function definition". It will open the file containing the specified function.

  2. Utilizing the monitorEvents() command

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According to this thread, there is no way in Firebug to view what events are attached to listeners on a DOM element.

It looks like the best you can do is either what tj111 suggests, or you could right-click the element in the HTML viewer, and click "Log Events" so you can see which events are firing for a particular DOM element. I suppose one could do that to see what events could be firing off particular functions.

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I also found jQuery Debugger in the chrome store. You can click on a dom item and it will show all events bound to it along with the callback function. I was debugging an application where events weren't being removed properly and this helped me track it down in minutes. Obviously this is for chrome though, not firefox.

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The bookmarklet on this page:

jQuery event tracer

will log jQuery events for the page you are viewing to the console.

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Firebug 2 does now incorporate DOM events debugging / inspection.

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