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I just wrote the following two functions:

fand :: (a -> Bool) -> (a -> Bool) -> a -> Bool
fand f1 f2 x = (f1 x) && (f2 x)

f_or :: (a -> Bool) -> (a -> Bool) -> a -> Bool
f_or f1 f2 x = (f1 x) || (f2 x)

They might be used to combined the values of two boolean functions such as:

import Text.ParserCombinators.Parsec
import Data.Char

nameChar = satisfy (isLetter `f_or` isDigit)

After looking at these two functions, I came to the realization that they are very useful. so much so that I now suspect that they are either included in the standard library, or more likely that there is a clean way to do this using existing functions.

What was the "right" way to do this?

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2  
Haskell, the language where everything is already in a a typeclass in the standard library somewhere. Typeclassopedia can help remedy that. –  Jared Updike Apr 19 '11 at 0:01
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6 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted

One simplification,

f_and = liftM2 (&&)
f_or  = liftM2 (||)

or

      = liftA2 (&&)         
      = liftA2 (||)

in the ((->) r) applicative functor.


Applicative version

Why? We have:

instance Applicative ((->) a) where
    (<*>) f g x = f x (g x)

liftA2 f a b = f <$> a <*> b

(<$>) = fmap

instance Functor ((->) r) where
    fmap = (.)

So:

  \f g -> liftA2 (&&) f g
= \f g -> (&&) <$> f <*> g          -- defn of liftA2
= \f g -> ((&&) . f) <*> g          -- defn of <$>
= \f g x -> (((&&) . f) x) (g x)    -- defn of <*> - (.) f g = \x -> f (g x)
= \f g x -> ((&&) (f x)) (g x)      -- defn of (.)
= \f g x -> (f x) && (g x)          -- infix (&&)

Monad version

Or for liftM2, we have:

instance Monad ((->) r) where
    return = const
    f >>= k = \ r -> k (f r) r

so:

  \f g -> liftM2 (&&) f g
= \f g -> do { x1 <- f; x2 <- g; return ((&&) x1 x2) }               -- defn of liftM2
= \f g -> f >>= \x1 -> g >>= \x2 -> return ((&&) x1 x2)              -- by do notation
= \f g -> (\r -> (\x1 -> g >>= \x2 -> return ((&&) x1 x2)) (f r) r)  -- defn of (>>=)
= \f g -> (\r -> (\x1 -> g >>= \x2 -> const ((&&) x1 x2)) (f r) r)   -- defn of return
= \f g -> (\r -> (\x1 ->
               (\r -> (\x2 -> const ((&&) x1 x2)) (g r) r)) (f r) r) -- defn of (>>=)
= \f g x -> (\r -> (\x2 -> const ((&&) (f x) x2)) (g r) r) x         -- beta reduce
= \f g x -> (\x2 -> const ((&&) (f x) x2)) (g x) x                   -- beta reduce
= \f g x -> const ((&&) (f x) (g x)) x                               -- beta reduce
= \f g x -> ((&&) (f x) (g x))                                       -- defn of const
= \f g x -> (f x) && (g x)                                           -- inline (&&)
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mind = blown. Very cool. –  Dan Burton Apr 19 '11 at 1:21
    
It's a bit trickier to see it working for the Monad instance, but it's nice to work it through. My first guess was on... got that one kind of backwards. –  acfoltzer Apr 19 '11 at 3:26
5  
Did the monad instance derivation too, for you, Adam –  Don Stewart Apr 19 '11 at 3:57
    
Excellent, though I found it easier to read from bottom to top. –  John F. Miller Apr 19 '11 at 4:42
    
You are so cute, Don!!!! –  Phil Apr 19 '11 at 15:56
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It's uglier if you always want two functions, but I think I'd generalize it:

mapAp fs x = map ($x) fs

fAnd fs = and . mapAp fs
fOr fs = or . mapAp fs

> fOr [(>2), (<0), (== 1.1)] 1.1
True
> fOr [(>2), (<0), (== 1.1)] 1.2
False
> fOr [(>2), (<0), (== 1.1)] 4
True
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That's the first time I've seen ($x) used in Haskell. For a second there I felt like I was back in PHP land shudder. –  Kendall Hopkins Apr 25 '11 at 4:23
    
Yeah, that's always an odd one, but it is shorter than (\f -> f x) –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Apr 25 '11 at 18:14
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Totally ripping off of TomMD, I saw the and . map and or . map and couldn't help but want to tweak it:

fAnd fs x = all ($x) fs
fOr fs x = any ($x) fs

These read nicely I think. fAnd: are all functions in the list True when x is applied to them? fOr: are any functions in the list True when x is applied to them?

ghci> fAnd [even, odd] 3
False
ghci> fOr [even, odd] 3
True

fOr is an odd name choice, though. Certainly a good one to throw those imperative programmers for a loop. =)

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Ah yes, much nicer implementations. How could I have neglected all and any?! –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Apr 19 '11 at 2:48
2  
fAnd = fmap and . sequence fOr = fmap or . sequence –  Tony Morris Apr 20 '11 at 0:27
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On top of what Don said, the liftA2/liftM2 versions may not be lazy enough:

> let a .&&. b = liftA2 (&&) a b in pure False .&&. undefined

*** Exception: Prelude.undefined

Woops!

So instead you might want a slightly different function. Note that this new function requires a Monad constraint -- Applicative is insufficient.

> let a *&&* b = a >>= \a' -> if a' then b else return a' in pure False *&&* undefined

False

That's better.

As for the answer that suggests the on function, this is for when the functions are the same but the arguments are different. In your given case, the functions are different but the arguments are the same. Here is your example altered so that on is an appropriate answer:

(f x) && (f y)

which can be written:

on (&&) f x y

PS: the parentheses are unnecessary.

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This works: let a .&&. b = liftA2 (&&) a b in (pure False .&&. undefined) () –  Sjoerd Visscher Apr 19 '11 at 11:48
    
@SjoerdVisscher Why is it lazy for the ((->)e) or Reader Monad and not for the IO Monad? –  Johannes Gerer May 23 '13 at 18:06
    
@JohannesGerer In f <*> a the side-effects in f have to occur before the side-effects in a. But the reader monad has no side-effects, so it can safely ignore computations from which the results aren't needed. –  Sjoerd Visscher May 23 '13 at 21:44
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This can also be done using Arrows:

import Control.Arrow ((&&&), (>>>), Arrow(..))

split_combine :: Arrow cat => cat (b, c) d -> cat a b -> cat a c -> cat a d
split_combine h f g = (f &&& g) >>> h

letter_or_digit = split_combine (uncurry (||)) isLetter isDigit

&&& (not related to &&) splits the input; >>> is arrow/category composition.

Here's an example:

> map letter_or_digit "aQ_%8"
[True,True,False,False,True]

This works because functions -- -> -- are instances of Category and Arrow. Comparing the type signatures to Don's liftA2 and liftM2 examples shows the similarities:

> :t split_combine 
split_combine :: Arrow cat => cat (b, c) d  -> cat a b -> cat a c -> cat a d

> :t liftA2
liftA2    :: Applicative f => (b -> c -> d) ->     f b ->     f c ->     f d

Besides the currying, note that you can almost convert the first type into the second by substituting cat a ---> f and Arrow ---> Applicative (the other difference is that split_combine isn't limited to taking pure functions in its 1st argument; probably not important though).

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If f1 and f2 are the same, then you can use 'on':

on :: (b -> b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> a -> a -> c

in base Data.Function

fand1 f = (&&) `on` f
for1 f = (||) `on` f

Typical usage:

Data.List.sortBy (compare `on` fst)

(from Hoogle)

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This does the opposite of what the question is seeking — it tests one function against multiple values (which is already handled capably by all and any), rather than multiple functions against one value. –  Chuck Apr 19 '11 at 0:10
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