Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to get opinions or suggestions regarding embedded databases in Java. In particular I was looking at H2, HSQLDB and Derby. Have you use any of these in a production project? Do you have comment or recommendations to select one over the others?

Thanks

Edit: I am currently evaluating these options to use in our internal developments, so I don't have a specific use case in mind. One of the possible uses I am evaluating them for is a desktop application that uses the database as a local repository. At some point it synchronizes with a central repository (in this case DB2). It is a store and forward architecture. Anyway, this is just a possibility to guide your answers, Basically I’m looking for your experiences using these tools.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Sylvain Defresne, drwelden, Jim O'Neil, Bohemian, Jonathan Day Feb 4 '13 at 4:01

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Without knowing what you're trying to do, it's not possible to answer this question. I suggest updating the question with info about the size of your project, how many tables you think you'll have, how many records, etc. –  Outlaw Programmer Sep 11 '08 at 17:20
add comment

11 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I use Apache Derby for pretty much all of my embedded database needs. You can also use Sun's Java DB that is based on Derby but the latest version of Derby is much newer. It supports a lot of options that commercial, native databases support but is much smaller and easier to embed. I've had some database tables with more than a million records with no issues.

I used to use HSQLDB and Hypersonic about 3 years ago. It has some major performance issues at the time and I switch to Derby from it because of those issues. Derby has been solid even when it was in incubator at Apache.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'd go with H2, the performance is meant to much better than Derby. Read http://www.h2database.com/html/performance.html for more info.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I needed to use Java embedded database in one of my projects and I did lot of research understanding pros and cons of each database. I wrote a blog listing pros and cons of popular embedded java databases (H2, HSQLDB, Derby, ObjectDB, Neo4j, OrientDB), you can have a look at it. I chose H2 as I thought it best suited my requirements. Link for the blog: http://sayrohan.blogspot.in/2012/12/choosing-light-weight-java-database.html Hope it helps!

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot for the link to your post - very interesting reading –  akhilless May 26 '13 at 7:14
    
You are welcome –  Rohan Karwa Jun 1 '13 at 23:33
    
+1 for the blog. –  Atul Jul 11 '13 at 8:37
add comment

Java DB (Sun's distribution of Apache Derby) now ships in JDK 6!

I've been wanted to do something like Jason Cohen and have been thinking this looks like the easiest way being in the JDK distro (which of last week is now a requirement for my app). Or maybe I am just lazy that way.

share|improve this answer
    
You're probably right! We have a requirement to also run under Java 1.5 so this isn't an option for us. –  Jason Cohen Sep 11 '08 at 17:45
    
...I meant you were right about it being the easiest way, not right about being lazy. :-P –  Jason Cohen Sep 11 '08 at 17:49
add comment

We use HSQLDB in production as a "no-configuration" option for our application. It allows people to trial without the hassle of setting up a real database.

However we do not support it for normal use. The reasons are several:

  1. Slows down proportionally to the size of the data.
  2. Difficult to access outside of our app (e.g. for custom reports).
  3. Transactions / disk-sync is difficult to get right, so it's easy to lose data.

For at least (2) and (3), there are ways around it but it's difficult; it's much easier to e.g. install MySQL.

share|improve this answer
add comment

neo4j is:

an embedded, disk-based, fully transactional Java persistence engine that stores data structured in graphs rather than in tables

I haven't had a chance to try it yet - but it looks very promising. Note this is not an SQL database - your object graph is persisted for you - so it might not be appropriate for your existing app.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I am a big fan of DB4O for both .Net and Java.

Performance has become much better since the early releases. The licensing model isnt too bad, either. I particularly like the options available for querying your objects. Query by example is very powerful and easy to get used to.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If I am correct H2 is from the same guys who wrote HSQLDB. Its a lot better if you trust the benchmarks on their site. Also, there is some notion that sun community jumped too quickly into Derby.

share|improve this answer
2  
What are the premature derby notions concerned about with DerbyDB? Maturity? –  simgineer Sep 5 '12 at 3:37
add comment

I have used Derby and i really hate it's data type conversion functions, especially date/time functions. (Number Type)<--> Varchar conversion it's a pain.

So that if you plan use data type conversions in your DB statements consider the use of othe embedded DB, i learn it too late.

Latest Derby Version data type conversions

share|improve this answer
add comment

I guess I'm a little late (a lot late;-)) to this post, but I'd like to add Perst, an open source, object-oriented embedded database for Java &.NET. for your consideration. Perst is an open source / dual license embedded database for Java. The distribution is compatible with Google's Android platform, and also includes Perst Lite for Java ME. We've even built an Android benchmark and produced a whitepaper on the subject...you can take a look here: http://www.mcobject.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=download&pageid=581&sectionid=133

All the best, Chris

share|improve this answer
add comment

H2, derby

but it really depends on what you're using it for.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.