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Most of this is straight from the hint example. What I'd like to do is initialize the interpreter with modules and imports and such and keep it around somehow. Later on (user events, or whatever), I want to be able to call a function with that initialized state and interpret an expression many times. So at the --split here location in the code, I want to have the code above in init, and the code below that in a new function that takes an expression and interprets it.

module Main where
import Language.Haskell.Interpreter
import Test.SomeModule

main :: IO ()
main = do r <- runInterpreter testHint
          case r of
            Left err -> printInterpreterError err
            Right () -> putStrLn "Done."
          -- Right here I want to do something like the following
          -- but how do I do testInterpret thing so it uses the
          -- pre-initialized interpreter?
          case (testInterpret "expression one")
            Left err -> printInterpreterError err
            Right () -> putStrLn "Done."
          case (testInterpret "expression two")
            Left err -> printInterpreterError err
            Right () -> putStrLn "Done."

testHint :: Interpreter ()
testHint =
    do
      loadModules ["src/Test/SomeModule.hs"]
      setImportsQ [("Prelude", Nothing), ("Test.SomeModule", Just "SM")]
      say "loaded"
      -- Split here, so what I want is something like this though I know
      -- this doesn't make sense as is:
      -- testExpr = Interpreter () -> String -> Interpreter ()
      -- testExpr hintmonad expr = interpret expr
      let expr1 = "let p1o1 = SM.exported undefined; p1o2 = SM.exported undefined; in p1o1"
      say $ "e.g. typeOf " ++ expr1
      say =<< typeOf expr1


say :: String -> Interpreter ()
say = liftIO . putStrLn

printInterpreterError :: InterpreterError -> IO ()
printInterpreterError e = putStrLn $ "Ups... " ++ (show e)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm having trouble understanding your question. Also I am not very familiar with hint. But I'll give it a go.

As far as I can tell, the Interpreter monad is just a simple state wrapper around IO -- it only exists so that you can say eg. setImportsQ [...] and have subsequent computations depend on the "settings" that were modified by that function. So basically you want to share the monadic context of multiple computations. The only way to do that is by staying within the monad -- by building a single computation in Interpreter and running it once. You can't have a "global variable" that escapes and reuses runInterpreter.

Fortunately, Interpreter is an instance of MonadIO, which means you can interleave IO computations and Interpreter computations using liftIO :: IO a -> Interpreter a. Basically you are thinking inside-out (an extremely common mistake for learners of Haskell). Instead of using a function in IO that runs code in your interpreter, use a function in Interpreter that runs code in IO (namely liftIO). So eg.

main = runInterpreter $ do
    testHint
    expr1 <- liftIO getLine
    r1 <- interpret "" expr1 
    case r1 of
        ...
    expr2 <- liftIO getLine
    r2 <- interpret "" expr2
    case r2 of
        ...

And you can easily pull that latter code out into a function if you need to, using the beauty of referential transparency! Just pull it straight out.

runSession :: Interpreter ()
runSession = do
    expr1 <- liftIO getLine
    r1 <- interpret "" expr1
    case interpret expr1 of
        ...

main = runInterpreter $ do
    testHint
    runSession

Does that make sense? Your whole program is an Interpreter computation, and only at the last minute do you pull it out into IO.

(That does not mean that every function you write should be in the Interpreter monad. Far from it! As usual, use Interpreter around the edges of your program and keep the core purely functional. Interpreter is the new IO).

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If I understand correctly, you want to initialize the compiler once, and run multiple queries, possibly interactively.

There are two main approaches:

  • lift IO actions into your Interpreter context (see luqui's answer).
  • use lazy IO to smuggle a stream of data in and out of your program.

I'll describe the second option.


By the magic of lazy IO, you can pass testHint a lazy stream of input, then loop in the body of testHint, interpreting many queries interactively:

main = do
      ls <- getContents   -- a stream of future input
      r <- runInterpreter (testHint (lines input))
      case r of
         Left err -> printInterpreterError err
         Right () -> putStrLn "Done."

testHint input = do
      loadModules ["src/Test/SomeModule.hs"]
      setImportsQ [("Prelude", Nothing), ("Test.SomeModule", Just "SM")]
      say "loaded"

      -- loop over the stream of input, interpreting commands
      let go (":quit":es) = return ()
             (e:es)       = do say =<< typeOf e
                               go es
      go

The go function has access to the closed-over environment of the initialized interpreter, so feeding it events will obviously run in the scope of that once-initialized interpreter.

An alternative method would be to extract the interpreter state from the monad, but I'm not sure that is possible in GHC (it would require GHC not to be in the IO monad fundamentally).

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I have changed my question a little trying to give a better indication of what I'm trying to do. I think I see where you're going, but I don't know how to later push something onto that stream and get a result back (error or not). –  taotree Apr 19 '11 at 7:08
    
Once there's a communication channel into your function, the go loop handles events. You could use an explicit Chan type instead (for both input and output). –  Don Stewart Apr 19 '11 at 17:06

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