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I'm looking for a better way to detect available/free disk space on the iPhone/iPad device programmatically.
Currently I'm using the NSFileManager to detect the disk space. Following is the snippet of the code which does the job for me:

-(unsigned)getFreeDiskspacePrivate {
NSDictionary *atDict = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:@"/" error:NULL];
unsigned freeSpace = [[atDict objectForKey:NSFileSystemFreeSize] unsignedIntValue];
NSLog(@"%s - Free Diskspace: %u bytes - %u MiB", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, freeSpace, (freeSpace/1024)/1024);

return freeSpace;
}


Am I correct with the above snippet? or is there any better way to know total available/free disk space.
I've to detect total free disk space, since we've to prevent our application to perform sync in the low disk space scenario.
Thanks in advance.

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I hope the stackoverflow link will help you.. –  JeffWood Apr 19 '11 at 6:45
1  
It looks like the code he's using in his question is better than the code in the link you have given (he's just checking one directory instead of traversing all sub-directories under "/") –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Apr 19 '11 at 6:54
    
Thanks Mikhail for the link. But I'm looking for total available/free disk space on iPhone/iPad device, not just a particular folder. For example, on a 32GB iPhone, if the total available/free size is 28GB, I should be able to detect that programmatically. –  Code.Warrior Apr 19 '11 at 7:29
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5 Answers

up vote 68 down vote accepted

I found the following solution working for me:

-(uint64_t)getFreeDiskspace {
    uint64_t totalSpace = 0;
    uint64_t totalFreeSpace = 0;
    NSError *error = nil;  
    NSArray *paths = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory, NSUserDomainMask, YES);  
    NSDictionary *dictionary = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:[paths lastObject] error: &error];  

    if (dictionary) {  
        NSNumber *fileSystemSizeInBytes = [dictionary objectForKey: NSFileSystemSize];  
        NSNumber *freeFileSystemSizeInBytes = [dictionary objectForKey:NSFileSystemFreeSize];
        totalSpace = [fileSystemSizeInBytes unsignedLongLongValue];
        totalFreeSpace = [freeFileSystemSizeInBytes unsignedLongLongValue];
        NSLog(@"Memory Capacity of %llu MiB with %llu MiB Free memory available.", ((totalSpace/1024ll)/1024ll), ((totalFreeSpace/1024ll)/1024ll));
    } else {  
        NSLog(@"Error Obtaining System Memory Info: Domain = %@, Code = %@", [error domain], [error code]);  
    }  

    return totalFreeSpace;
}

It returns me exactly the size that iTunes displays when device is connected to machine.

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2  
Converting to a float may give inaccurate results above around 2GB. If you need to deal with really large file sizes, use a double or long double instead. –  Ash Feb 3 '12 at 10:16
    
As pointed by Ash, this method has a inaccurate result. In my iPad 2, with 64GB, it fails by +0.25 GB... The method below, posted by David H, has the accurate result when using uint64_t vars. –  Leandro Alves Jun 12 '12 at 17:33
1  
The code snippet has been edited to reflect suggestions from @David H as shown below. –  Code.Warrior Jun 13 '12 at 6:39
3  
[error code] should not use %@ when format using NSLog. –  tangqiaoboy Nov 28 '13 at 8:02
    
@Code.Warrior I use this method to calculate the total free space in device. It returns me 978 MB of freespace. But when i got to General-->Usage and see there 778 MB Available (freesapace). What is the reason and which one is right? –  maniganda saravanan Mar 6 at 11:33
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Revised source using unsigned long long:

- (uint64_t)freeDiskspace
{
    uint64_t totalSpace = 0;
    uint64_t totalFreeSpace = 0;

    __autoreleasing NSError *error = nil;  
    NSArray *paths = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory, NSUserDomainMask, YES);  
    NSDictionary *dictionary = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:[paths lastObject] error: &error];  

    if (dictionary) {  
        NSNumber *fileSystemSizeInBytes = [dictionary objectForKey: NSFileSystemSize];  
        NSNumber *freeFileSystemSizeInBytes = [dictionary objectForKey:NSFileSystemFreeSize];
        totalSpace = [fileSystemSizeInBytes unsignedLongLongValue];
        totalFreeSpace = [freeFileSystemSizeInBytes unsignedLongLongValue];
        NSLog(@"Memory Capacity of %llu MiB with %llu MiB Free memory available.", ((totalSpace/1024ll)/1024ll), ((totalFreeSpace/1024ll)/1024ll));
    } else {  
        NSLog(@"Error Obtaining System Memory Info: Domain = %@, Code = %d", [error domain], [error code]);  
    }  

    return totalFreeSpace;
}

EDIT: it seems someone edited this code to use 'uint64_t' instead of 'unsigned long long'. While in the foreseeable future this should be just fine, they are not the same. 'uint64_t' is 64 bits and will always be that. In 10 years 'unsigned long long' might be 128. its a small point but why I used unsignedLongLong.

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I don't have experience with the new automatic counting system but Whats the __autoreleasing for? You normally don't need to autorelease the NSError returned –  the Reverend Feb 24 '12 at 23:42
    
This is related to ARC. Its explained in the Apple docs that when you provide the address of an NSError, if you do not use the __autoreleasing" qualifier, that the compiler ends up doing a copy from the error that is returned and your strong ivar. Sorry I cannot find the reference right now but there are only two Apple docs on this. This issue was also raised by Apple at the 2011 WWDC sessions on ARC. –  David H Feb 25 '12 at 20:14
    
This might help: stackoverflow.com/questions/8862023/… –  Fabian Kreiser May 30 '12 at 9:56
    
"Code = %@" should be "Code = %d" –  Or Arbel Dec 16 '12 at 9:50
1  
@Diejmon you cannot ask NSNumber for an integeral size of this type. This is why for such things I prefer a unit of known bit size. While technically I agree with your statement, I already have enough warnings to deal with using NSInteger and format strings! 64 bits will be enough bits for sure in my lifetime and yours. –  David H Mar 3 at 14:19
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Don't use 'unsigned', it is only 32 bits which will overflow past 4GB, which is less than the typical iPad/iPhone free space. Use unsigned long long (or uint64_t), and retrieve the value out of the NSNumber as a 64-bit int too using unsignedLongLongValue.

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Thanks for that tip :) –  Code.Warrior Nov 7 '11 at 12:27
    
Its better than a tip - "Its the Law" :-) As he said, the original code is just plain wrong. –  David H Feb 7 '12 at 16:28
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If you need formatted string with size you can take a look at nice library on GitHub:

#define MB (1024*1024)
#define GB (MB*1024)

@implementation ALDisk

#pragma mark - Formatter

+ (NSString *)memoryFormatter:(long long)diskSpace {
    NSString *formatted;
    double bytes = 1.0 * diskSpace;
    double megabytes = bytes / MB;
    double gigabytes = bytes / GB;
    if (gigabytes >= 1.0)
        formatted = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%.2f GB", gigabytes];
    else if (megabytes >= 1.0)
        formatted = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%.2f MB", megabytes];
    else
        formatted = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%.2f bytes", bytes];

    return formatted;
}

#pragma mark - Methods

+ (NSString *)totalDiskSpace {
    long long space = [[[[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:NSHomeDirectory() error:nil] objectForKey:NSFileSystemSize] longLongValue];
    return [self memoryFormatter:space];
}

+ (NSString *)freeDiskSpace {
    long long freeSpace = [[[[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:NSHomeDirectory() error:nil] objectForKey:NSFileSystemFreeSize] longLongValue];
    return [self memoryFormatter:freeSpace];
}

+ (NSString *)usedDiskSpace {
    return [self memoryFormatter:[self usedDiskSpaceInBytes]];
}

+ (CGFloat)totalDiskSpaceInBytes {
    long long space = [[[[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:NSHomeDirectory() error:nil] objectForKey:NSFileSystemSize] longLongValue];
    return space;
}

+ (CGFloat)freeDiskSpaceInBytes {
    long long freeSpace = [[[[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:NSHomeDirectory() error:nil] objectForKey:NSFileSystemFreeSize] longLongValue];
    return freeSpace;
}

+ (CGFloat)usedDiskSpaceInBytes {
    long long usedSpace = [self totalDiskSpaceInBytes] - [self freeDiskSpaceInBytes];
    return usedSpace;
}
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This one should be the correct answer. –  Robert Yi Jiang Jan 24 at 1:21
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-(uint64_t)getFreeDiskspace {
   uint64_t totalSpace = 0;
   uint64_t totalFreeSpace = 0;
   NSError *error = nil;  
   NSArray *paths = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory, NSUserDomainMask, YES);  
   NSDictionary *dictionary = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] attributesOfFileSystemForPath:[paths lastObject] error: &error];  

    if (dictionary) {  
        NSNumber *fileSystemSizeInBytes = [dictionary objectForKey: NSFileSystemSize];  
        NSNumber *freeFileSystemSizeInBytes = [dictionary objectForKey:NSFileSystemFreeSize];
        totalSpace = [fileSystemSizeInBytes unsignedLongLongValue];
        totalFreeSpace = [freeFileSystemSizeInBytes unsignedLongLongValue];
        NSLog(@"Memory Capacity of %llu MiB with %llu MiB Free memory available.", ((totalSpace/1024ll)/1024ll), ((totalFreeSpace/1024ll)/1024ll));
    } else {  
        NSLog(@"Error Obtaining System Memory Info: Domain = %@, Code = %@", [error domain], [error code]);  
    }  

  return totalFreeSpace;
}
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4  
This is copied and pasted from another answer... –  PsychoDad Dec 4 '13 at 15:35
    
so wht its working or not that is mainthing......... –  mahesh chowdary Feb 20 at 4:37
2  
Its not the main thing... only-code answers with no explanation or citation are not the main thing here. –  Morkrom Mar 5 at 21:37
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