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Whenever I compile/run the code, extern tolayer2(rtpktTo1); I receive a warning. The warning reads, as in the title, Warning: parameter names (without types) in function declaration

Any help appreciated.

node0.c

extern struct rtpkt {
  int sourceid;       /* id of sending router sending this pkt */
  int destid;         /* id of router to which pkt being sent 
                         (must be an immediate neighbor) */
  int mincost[4];    /* current understanding of min cost to node 0 ... 3 */
  };

/* Create routing packets (rtpkt) and send to neighbors via tolayer2(). */
    struct rtpkt rtpktTo1;
        rtpktTo1.sourceid = 0;
        rtpktTo1.destid = 1;
        rtpktTo1.mincost[0] = minCost[0];
        rtpktTo1.mincost[1] = minCost[1];
        rtpktTo1.mincost[2] = minCost[2];
        rtpktTo1.mincost[3] = minCost[3];

extern tolayer2(rtpktTo1);

prog3.c

tolayer2(packet)
  struct rtpkt packet;
{
  /* This has a lot of code in it */ 
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The assignments to rkpktTo1.* are not apparently in a function or declaration, unless this is a code fragment. Wrap them in a function. The warning is a bit misleading.

The declaration of tolayer2() should have a return type as well as a parameter type. Since there isn't one, int is assumed. This may not be what is intended, but it should compile without warnings and errors:

node0.c

struct rtpkt {
  int sourceid;       /* id of sending router sending this pkt */
  int destid;         /* id of router to which pkt being sent 
                         (must be an immediate neighbor) */
  int mincost[4];    /* current understanding of min cost to node 0 ... 3 */
  };

/* Create routing packets (rtpkt) and send to neighbors via tolayer2(). */
void function () {
    struct rtpkt rtpktTo1;
        rtpktTo1.sourceid = 0;
        rtpktTo1.destid = 1;
        rtpktTo1.mincost[0] = minCost[0];
        rtpktTo1.mincost[1] = minCost[1];
        rtpktTo1.mincost[2] = minCost[2];
        rtpktTo1.mincost[3] = minCost[3];
}
extern void tolayer2(struct rtpkt *rtpktTo1);

prog3.c

void
tolayer2(struct rtpkt *packet)
{
  /* This has a lot of code in it */ 
}

Passing a structure by value is often not appropriate, so I have changed it to pass by reference.

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Thank you very much!!! –  Mr. White Apr 19 '11 at 7:39

In the declaration extern tolayer2(rtpktTo1);, rtpktTo1 is a parameter name (like the error says), while you should give a type there:

extern tolayer2(struct rtpkt);

or

extern tolayer2(struct rtpkt *);

or

extern tolayer2(struct rtpkt const *);

or similar, since that is what the compiler needs to know about your function before compiling client code. The parameter name is useless to the compiler at this point and therefore optional.

(And really, you should add a return type as well, and note that extern has no meaning in your struct definition.)

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This was also helpful, thank you. The issue was with the extern call, I made a mistake when I typed in prog3.c. –  Mr. White Apr 19 '11 at 7:40

In prog3.c

tolayer2(packet)
  struct rtpkt packet;
{ /* ... */ }

This is old syntax (very old: before ANSI standardized C in 1989), but perfectly legal in C89 and C99. Don't use it though: prefer

int tolayer2(struct rtpkt packet)
{ /* ... */ }
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1  
Haha my professor provided us with the code. Good to know colleges keep up with times eh? Thanks for the info. –  Mr. White Apr 21 '11 at 22:04

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