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All I wanna do is to check whether an element exists in the vector or not, so I can deal with each case.

if ( item_present )
   do_this();
else
   do that();
share|improve this question
    
searching in a vector is very slow since you have to look at every single element of the vector so consider using a map if you're doing a lot of lookups –  naumcho Feb 20 '09 at 22:31
2  
@naumcho: If the vector is sorted there's always binary search, as posted below. This makes it as fast as a map and if you're only storing values (not key/value maps) then it's going to use a lot less memory. –  Adam Hawes Feb 21 '09 at 1:01
    
maps are certainly not the best choice, but using set might be useful. If you need O(1) lookup time, hash_set is the way to go. –  Philipp Oct 8 '10 at 8:58

12 Answers 12

up vote 291 down vote accepted

Some variant of:

std::find(vector.begin(), vector.end(), item)!=vector.end()
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4  
Possibly. It depends on how often you search empty vectors. –  MSN Feb 21 '09 at 0:31
137  
I don't see how count() could be faster than find(), since find() stops as soon as one element is found, while count() always has to scan the whole sequence. –  Éric Malenfant Feb 21 '09 at 3:29
60  
Don't forget to #include <algorithm> or else you might get very strange errors like 'can't find matching function in namespace std' –  rustyx Mar 2 '12 at 15:46
11  
Has it not bothered anyone that despite the STL being "object-oriented", .find() is still not a member function of std::vector, as you'd expect it should be? I wonder if this is somehow a consequence of templating. –  bobobobo Dec 7 '12 at 2:33
7  
@bobobobo: OOP has nothing to do with members vs. non-members. And there is a widespread school of thought that if something does not have to be a member, or when it does not give any advantage when implemented as a member, than it should not be a member; std::vector<>::find() would not give any advantage, nor is it needed, therefore, no, it should not be a member. See also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupling_%28computer_programming%29 –  phresnel Feb 4 '13 at 13:54

As others have said, use the STL find or find_if functions. But if you are searching in very large vectors and this impacts performance, you may want to sort your vector and then use the binary_search, lower_bound, or upper_bound algorithms.

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Good answer! Find is always o(n). lower_bound is o(log(n)) if used with random-access iterators. –  Stephen Edmonds Jul 8 '09 at 19:54
    
Sorting is O(nlogn) though, so it's worth only if you're doing more than O(logn) searches. –  liori Jun 15 at 0:48
    
@liori True it depends on your usage patterns. If you only need to sort it once, then repeatedly do many searches it can save you. –  Brian Neal Jun 17 at 16:24

Use find from the algorithm header of stl.I've illustrated its use with int type. You can use any type you like as long as you can compare for equality (overload == if you need to for your custom class).

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{	
	typedef vector<int> IntContainer;
	typedef IntContainer::iterator IntIterator;

	IntContainer vw;

	//...

	// find 5
	IntIterator i = find(vw.begin(), vw.end(), 5);

	if (i != vw.end()) {
		// found it
	} else {
        // doesn't exist
    }

	return 0;
}
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1  
Depending on the OP's needs, find_if() could also be appropriate. It allows to search using an arbitrary predicate instead of equality. –  Éric Malenfant Feb 20 '09 at 22:12
    
Oops, saw your comment too late. The answer I gave also mentions find_if. –  Frank Feb 20 '09 at 22:19

If your vector is not ordered, use the approach MSN suggested:

if(std::find(vector.begin(), vector.end(), item)!=vector.end()){
      // Find the item
}

If your vector is ordered, use binary_search method Brian Neal suggested:

if(binary_search(vector.begin(), vector.end(), item)){
     // Find the item
}

binary search yields O(log n) worst-case performance, which is way more efficient than the first approach. In order to use binary search, you may use qsort to sort the vector first to guarantee it is ordered.

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1  
Don't you mean std::sort? qsort is very inefficient on vectors.... see: stackoverflow.com/questions/12308243/… –  Jason R. Mick Aug 16 '13 at 1:57

Use the STL find function.

Keep in mind that there is also a find_if function, which you can use if your search is more complex, i.e. if you're not just looking for an element, but, for example, want see if there is an element that fulfills a certain condition, for example, a string that starts with "abc". (find_if would give you an iterator that points to the first such element).

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Bear in mind that, if you're going to be doing a lot of lookups, there are STL containers that are better for that. I don't know what your application is, but associative containers like std::map may be worth considering.

std::vector is the container of choice unless you have a reason for another, and lookups by value can be such a reason.

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Even with lookups by value the vector can be a good choice, as long as it is sorted and you use binary_search, lower_bound or upper_bound. If the contents of the container changes between lookups, vector is not very good because of the need to sort again. –  Renze de Waal Feb 20 '09 at 22:49

You can try this code:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

// You can use class, struct or primitive data type for Item
struct Item {
    //Some fields
};
typedef std::vector<Item> ItemVector;
typedef ItemVector::iterator ItemIterator;
//...
ItemVector vtItem;
//... (init data for vtItem)
Item itemToFind;
//...

ItemIterator itemItr;
itemItr = std::find(vtItem.begin(), vtItem.end(), itemToFind);
if (itemItr != vtItem.end()) {
    // Item found
    // doThis()
}
else {
    // Item not found
    // doThat()
}
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I use something like this...

#include <algorithm>


template <typename T> 
const bool Contains( std::vector<T>& Vec, const T& Element ) 
{
    if (std::find(Vec.begin(), Vec.end(), Element) != Vec.end())
        return true;

    return false;
}

if (Contains(vector,item))
   blah
else
   blah

...as that way it's actually clear and readable. (Obviously you can reuse the template in multiple places).

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If you wanna find a string in a vector:

    struct isEqual
{
    isEqual(const std::string& s): m_s(s)
    {}

    bool operator()(OIDV* l)
    {
        return l->oid == m_s;
    }

    std::string m_s;
};
struct OIDV
{
    string oid;
//else
};
VecOidv::iterator itFind=find_if(vecOidv.begin(),vecOidv.end(),isEqual(szTmp));
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template <typename T> bool IsInVector(T what, std::vector<T> * vec)
{
    if(std::find(vec->begin(),vec->end(),what)!=vec->end())
        return true;
    return false;
}
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You can use the find function, found in the std namespace, ie std::find. You pass the std::find function the begin and end iterator from the vector you want to search, along with the element you're looking for and compare the resulting iterator to the end of the vector to see if they match or not.

std::find(vector.begin(), vector.end(), item) != vector.end()

You're also able to dereference that iterator and use it as normal, like any other iterator.

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The brute force approach (again presuming int as the stored type):

int value_to_find;
vector<int> cont;
vector<int>::const_iterator found = cont.find(value_to_find);
if (found != cont.end()) {
    do_this();
} else {
    do_that();
}

If you're doing many lookups in large vectors, this can be inefficient. You may want to cache your results in order to avoid doing the same search twice (assumes int as the stored type):

int value_to_find;
vector<int> cont;                         // main container
map<int, size_t> contPos;                 // position cache

// first see if the value is in cache
map<int, size_t>::const_iterator foundCache = contPos.find(value_to_find);
if (foundCache != contPos.end()) {
    do_this();
}
// not in cache, now do brute force search
vector<int>::const_iterator found = cont.find(value_to_find);
if (found != cont.end()) {
    // cache the value with its position
    contPos[value_to_find] = found - cont.begin();

    do_this();
} else {                                  // in neither
    do_that();
}
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18  
std::vector doesn't have a find member function. –  Brian Neal Apr 21 '10 at 17:54

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