Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a number of shell scripts that all look like this:

#!/bin/bash

cd ~/Dropbox/cms_sites/examplesite/media
sass -C --style compressed --update css:css

cd ~/Dropbox/cms_sites/examplesite

rm -f ./cache/*.html
rm -fr ./media/.sass-cache/
rm -fr ./admin/media/.sass-cache/


rsync -auvzhL . username@host:/home/username/remote_folder

(I know the use of cd seems weird, but they have evolved!)

Now, all these scripts have a few differences, in that they have different usernames, hosts, local folder and remote folder names, and I want an inexperienced user to be able to run them without arguments (so he can drag and drop them into a terminal without issue).

What I'd like to do is something like:

#!/bin/bash

cd ~/Dropbox/cms_sites/examplesite/media
sass -C --style compressed --update css:css

cd ~/Dropbox/cms_sites/examplesite

include ~/scripts/common.sh

rsync -auvzhL . username@host:/home/username/remote_folder

then have a file in common.sh that looks like:

rm -f ./cache/*.html
rm -fr ./media/.sass-cache/
rm -fr ./admin/media/.sass-cache/

so that I can easily change sections of the code in lots of scripts at once.

Is this possible, or is there a better way to do this without using arguments and having one script?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use the source command. It's bash's version of 'include'

share|improve this answer
    
It also has implications that should cause one to hesitate before suggesting it. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 19 '11 at 9:23
    
Indeed. But he asked explicitly for 'include'. –  pepoluan Apr 19 '11 at 9:25
    
Of course, source is likely the way to go. As shown above, I want that file to run in the context of the current script, which I think source will do. I'll try it. What are the implications Ignacio? –  Rich Bradshaw Apr 19 '11 at 9:47
    
@Rich among others, be careful not to end the source-d script with 'exit'; you'll terminate the source-ing script. And since the source-d script runs in the same context, doing environment changes (setting shell variables, changing directories, etc) affects the source-ing script. –  pepoluan Apr 19 '11 at 11:52
    
Another one I just noticed is make sure you are same directory at the end of that script as you are the the start... –  Rich Bradshaw Apr 19 '11 at 12:03

No need for "include" if the script is executable:

~/scripts/common.sh

If the script is not executable or does not have an appropriate shebang line then you'll need to specify the interpreter:

bash ~/scripts/common.sh
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.