Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this program I am making a dictionary from a plain text file, basically I count the amount a word occurs in a document, the word becomes the key and the amount of time it occurs is the value. I can create the dictionary but then I cannot search through the dictionary. Here is my updated code with your guys' input. I really appreciate the help.

from collections import defaultdict
import operator
def readFile(fileHandle):
    d = defaultdict(int)
    with open(fileHandle, "r") as myfile:
        for currline in myfile: 
            for word in currline.split():
                d[word] +=1
    return d

def reverseLookup(dictionary, value):
    for key in dictionary.keys():
        if dictionary[key] == value:
            return key
    return None

afile = raw_input ("What is the absolute file path: ")
print readFile (afile)

choice = raw_input ("Would you like to (1) Query Word Count (2) Print top words to a new document     (3) Exit: ") 
if (choice == "1"):
    query = raw_input ("What word would like to look up? ")
    print reverseLookup(readFile(afile), query)
if (choice == "2"):
    f = open("new.txt", "a")
    d = dict(int)
    for w in text.split():
        d[w] += 1
    f.write(d)
    file.close (f)
if (choice == "3"):
    print "The EXIT has HAPPENED"
else:
    print "Error"
share|improve this question
1  
So... what's the problem again? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 19 '11 at 9:26
1  
What is the line d = supposed to do? –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 19 '11 at 9:27
    
your reverseLookup function seems to look for the first word with v occurrences, is that what you want ? Also, you shouldn't use the keyword dict –  aminho Apr 19 '11 at 9:33
    
@Bryan: You can simply paste the code as-is, then select all of it and press Ctrl-K. Then it will be indented correctly. –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 19 '11 at 10:21
    
@Tim Pietzcker took care of it –  Bryan Apr 19 '11 at 11:08

4 Answers 4

Your approach is very complicated (and syntactically wrong, at least in your posted code sample).

Also, you're rebinding the built-in name dict which is problematic, too.

Furthermore, this functionality is already built-in in Python:

from collections import defaultdict

def readFile(fileHandle):
    d = defaultdict(int)  # Access to undefined keys creates a entry with value 0
    with open(fileHandle, "r") as myfile:   # File will automatically be closed
        for currline in myfile:             # Loop through file line-by-line
            for word in currline.strip().split(): # Loop through words w/o CRLF
                d[word] +=1                 # Increase word counter
    return d

As for your reverseLookup function, see ypercube's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, I am new at this and I want to understand how this works. I am having trouble reading your code when it is all meshed together like that –  Bryan Apr 19 '11 at 9:37
    
You're right, that code needed some comments. Is it clearer now? –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 19 '11 at 9:39
    
Yes it is...thank you –  Bryan Apr 19 '11 at 10:18

Your code returns after it looks in the first (key,value) pair. You have to search the whole dictionary before returning that the value has not been found.

def reverseLookup(dictionary, value):
    for key in dictionary.keys():
        if dictionary[key] == value:
            return key
    return None

You should also not return "error" as it can be a word and thus a key in your dictionary!

share|improve this answer
1  
Don't use the dict keyword, that's a very bad idea –  aminho Apr 19 '11 at 9:30
    
right now I have d = dict() –  Bryan Apr 19 '11 at 9:33
1  
So right now you are instantiating a blank dictionary each time you call reverseLookup –  aminho Apr 19 '11 at 9:39
1  
Why create a new variable d? Why not simply use def reverseLookup(d, v): and drop the second line? –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 19 '11 at 9:39
    
every time I try to search the dictionary with user input it always comes up as d is not defined –  Bryan Apr 19 '11 at 9:44

Depending upon how you're intending to use this reverseLookup() function, you might find your code much happier if you employ two dictionaries: build the first dictionary as you already do, and then build a second dictionary that contains mappings between the number of occurrences and the words that occurred that many times. Then your reverseLookup() wouldn't need to perform the for k in d.keys() loop on every single lookup. That loop would only happen once, and every single lookup after that would run significantly faster.

I've cobbled together (but not tested) some code that shows what I'm talking about. I stole Tim's readFile() routine, because I like the look of it more :) but took his nice function-local dictionary d and moved it to global, just to keep the functions short and sweet. In a 'real project', I'd probably wrap the whole thing in a class to allow arbitrary number of dictionaries at run time and provide reasonable encapsulation. This is just demo code. :)

import operator
from collections import defaultdict

d = defaultdict(int)
numbers_dict = {}

def readFile(fileHandle):
    with open(fileHandle, "r") as myfile:
        for currline in myfile:
            for word in currline.split():
                d[word] +=1
    return d


def prepareReverse():
    for (k,v) in d.items():
        old_list = numbers_dict.get(v, [])
        new_list = old_list << k
        numbers_dict[v]=new_list

def reverseLookup(v):
    numbers_dict[v]

If you intend on making two or more lookups, this code will trade memory for execution speed. You only iterate through the dictionary once (iteration over all elements is not a dict's strong point), but at the cost of duplicate data in memory.

share|improve this answer

The search is not working because you have a dictionary mapping a word to its count, so getting the number of occurrences for a 'word' should be just dictionary[word]. You don't really need the reveseLookup(), there is already a .get(key, default_value) method in dict: dictionary.get(value, None)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.