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Here's a class template I wrote. It has two public functions (three if you count Instance(); it's a singleton) and four private functions. The code is less important; what I'd like is to ask you if you think my doc comments are too explicit.

I tried to document what happens when the input is wrong, etc, and be precise about everything, but other libraries I've seen didn't have such explicit documentation — am I overdoing it?

/**
    \class ResourceManager

    \details Singleton class template used for ensuring resources do not get
    loaded into memory more than once at any given time. Types (classes) used
    as template parameters must implement the IResource interface.

    \see IResource

    \todo Add messages to the Logger if the creation of a new resource
    fails. The documentation of pushNewResource() and acquire() will have
    to be updated.
                                                                              */
template<class T>
class ResourceManager
{
  public:
    static ResourceManager<T>* Instance();
    /**
        \fn acquire

        \details Function used for accessing resource. It loads the resource
        or returns the already loaded resource, depending on whether or not
        it has been previously loaded into memory. A null pointer is returned
        on failure.

        \param file Path to the file to be loaded. An invalid path will
        result in a null pointer being returned.

        \return Pointer to the resource or null pointer on failure.

        \note The resource should be released through the release() function
        when no longer required.
                                                                              */
    T* acquire(const std::string& file);
    /**
        \fn release

        \details Checks to see if the resource is loaded in memory. If it is,
        it determines whether it is still in use and if not it deletes it.

        \param ptr Pointer to the object to release. Null pointers or
        pointers to non-existent objects will not produce any errors.
                                                                              */
    void release(T* ptr);

  protected:
    ResourceManager();
    ResourceManager(const ResourceManager<T>& other);
    ResourceManager<T>& operator=(const ResourceManager<T>& other);
    ~ResourceManager();

  private:
    struct ResourceWrapper;
    std::list<ResourceWrapper*> resources_;

    /**
        \fn searchForResource(const std::string&)

        \details Searches the list of resources for one whose source file
        path matches the given string.

        \param file String of the path to the source file. Invalid paths
        will not produce any errors.

        \return Returns std::list<>::iterator to the found resource or the
        std::list<>::end() iterator if nothing found.
                                                                              */
    typename std::list<ResourceWrapper*>::iterator
        searchForResource(const std::string& file);
    /**
        \fn serachForResource(const T*)

        \details Seraches the list of resources for one whose pointer
        matches the parameter.

        \param ptr Pointer to the object to find. Null pointers or
        pointers of non-existent objects will not produce any errors.

        \return Returns std::list<>::iterator to the found resource or the
        std::list<>::end() iterator if nothing found.
                                                                              */
    typename std::list<ResourceWrapper*>::iterator
        searchForResource(const T* ptr);

    /**
        \fn pushNewResource

        \details Attempts to create a new reosurce corresponding to the
        given file path and push it to the resources list.

        \param file String containing the path to the resource file. Incorrect
        paths or paths to incorrect files will result in the std::list<>::end()
        iterator being returned.

        \return Returns std::list<>::iterator to newly added reosurce or the
        std::list<>::end() iterator if the resource could not be created.
                                                                              */
    typename std::list<ResourceWrapper*>::iterator
        pushNewResource(const std::string& file);
    /**
        \fn deleteResource

        \details Removes the resource corresponding to the given iterator
        from the resources list. No check is done to ensure the iterator is
        valid or to ensure the resource is no longer in use.

        \param it An std::list<>::iterator pointing to the resource to be
        deleted. Validity of the iterator is not checked.

        \note The iterator is best acquired through the searchForResource()
        private member function.
                                                                              */
    void deleteResource(typename std::list<ResourceWrapper*>::iterator it);
};
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your comments are descriptive, and that's a good thing, but you could be more brief without losing any information, and save yourself and the reader some time.

For example, you could express this:

    \details Function used for accessing resource. It loads the resource
    or returns the already loaded resource, depending on whether or not
    it has been previously loaded into memory. A null pointer is returned
    on failure.

    \param file Path to the file to be loaded. An invalid path will
    result in a null pointer being returned.

    \return Pointer to the resource or null pointer on failure.

...like this:

    \details Load a resource. If the resource is already loaded, the cached
    resource will be returned.

    \param file Path to the resource file.

    \return The loaded resource, or null on failure.

The main points of this: - Don't state the obvious. The reader already knows it's "A function that...", and that 'null' implies a 'null pointer'. - Put information in the most appropriate place (e.g. 'returns null' in the 'returns' section), and do not repeat it in any other entries - the param and details entries don't need to mention anything about what the function returns.

This saves both typing and reading time. Also, if you don't repeat information, then you only have to update one part of the comment when you refactor the method (imagine that you change it to return a NullResourceObject instance instead of null on failure - you should only have to update the 'returns' entry of the docs to make this change).

share|improve this answer

I concur Jason Williams in saying that repetition is bad. But in addition to repetition within the comment itself, you should also avoid repeating what the code itself already tells. Code has an inherent tendency to get out of sync from comments. An example from your own code:

/**
    \fn serachForResource(const T*)

    \details Seraches the list of resources for one whose pointer
    matches the parameter.

    \param ptr Pointer to the object to find. Null pointers or
    pointers of non-existent objects will not produce any errors.

    \return Returns std::list<>::iterator to the found resource or the
    std::list<>::end() iterator if nothing found.
                                                                          */
typename std::list<ResourceWrapper*>::iterator
    searchForResource(const T* ptr);

The name of function is repeated in comment, and the inevitable happened: it was misspelled. But this can't be blamed on the person who wrote the comment - it's more a problem of a tool that isn't able to automatically detect such obvious information from the code.

I'm not a C++-person, so I don't know a thing about the documentation tool you are using, but if at all possible, I would suggest you look for a better tool that doesn't force you to repeat yourself so much.

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1  
Yes... but beware. There are two uses for doc comments: 1) To document the code within the source, 2) for external documentation (Sandcastle/Doxygen/JavaDoc). If you ever use (2), then you do not have access to the code. As it happens, the 'fn' tag is not necessary in Doxygen if the comment directly precedes the code element it's documenting, so this entry could be skipped. alternatively, tools like AtomineerUtils (for visual studio, but there are similar things for other IDEs) will help you update documentation to keep the comment in sync with the code more easily. –  Jason Williams Apr 20 '11 at 16:26

As a general rule I guess you can never have too verbose comments in code... the opposite is usually the case.

But you want to make sure your comments are concise too. Remember that someone has to read them through and they might get dissuaded if there is too much text.

But skimming your comments I can't say they have superfluous information, but there is some text. Maybe instead of having your comments in "flowing prose", have them more written in a shorter notes "format".

Eg.:

\details Singleton class template used for ensuring resources do not get
    loaded into memory more than once at any given time. Types (classes) used
    as template parameters must implement the IResource interface.

would be something like:

\details template used to ensure 1 instance in memory. Classes used
    as template parameters must implement IResource interface.

I dunno if that helps and it's not the definitive answer, but probably more up to you and/or the norms where you work.

But I know that I would prefer concise comments, as I want to be able to skim them rapidly.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, conciseness is definitely something to strive for, but I'd still use proper grammar. Maybe you just gave a bad example (or maybe you left out some words), but template used to 1 instance in memory doesn't make much sense to me. :) –  Paul Manta Apr 19 '11 at 10:25
    
Ah yeah, that doesn't make much sense... with regards to proper grammar, yes... but I don't think you need to need full sentences anyway I'll edit my that sentence as I seem to have forgotten one word –  Holger Apr 19 '11 at 11:28

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