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I have the following code Snippet.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            Thread m_thread = new Thread(() =>
                {
                    //try
                    //{
                        checkexc();
                    //}
                    //catch (Exception ex)
                    //{

                    //}
                }
                );               
            m_thread.Start();

        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {

        }
    }
    static void checkexc()
    {
        throw new NullReferenceException();
    }
}

NullReferenceException is not handled by the covering Try-Catch block. However if i wrap the delegate inside thread() constructor, then it is handled by that Try-Catch. Why doesnot outer Try-Catch handle this exception.

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7  
because it is a different thread –  ColWhi Apr 19 '11 at 9:51
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Imagine you have a main road (A), and another road branches off from that road (B).

When a truck goes along A, if it crashes, then A will know about it, and traffic will stop.

When a truck goes along B, if it crashes, then B will know about it, and traffic will stop.

But by what mechanism will B tell A that a truck has crashed on it?

Once the truck is on B, it is not affecting A, unless there is another entry point along A into B.

How will the exception in your other thread be communicated to the main thread? Once the other thread is running, it no longer (directly) communicates with the main thread.

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Yes, this is a leaky abstraction –  Matt Ellen Apr 19 '11 at 9:56
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Because the exception didnt happen in the thread constructor. checkexc() is called only after m_thread.Start() is called and it's executed on another thread.

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To answer this from another angle:

The Task Parallel Library (TPL) does handle (catch & propagate) exceptions for you.

But the exceptions appear at the point where you Wait() for the Tasks to complete, not on the point/thread where you start the Tasks.

    // No point in specifically surrounding the next 2 statements
    Task t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Foo());
    Task t2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Bar());

    try
    {
        Task.WaitAll(t1, t2);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex);  // Aggregated exceptions from Foo and/or Bar
    }

When using Parallel.ForEach() the code looks like yours because there is an implicit WaitAll() at the end of the ForEach().

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As Matt's explanation details, exceptions thrown on a child thread do not bubble up to the parent thread. However, if you would like to be able to catch an exception from a child thread, here's one way to do it:

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Action action = BeginCheckExc;
        IAsyncResult result = action.BeginInvoke(new AsyncCallback(EndCheckExc), null);

        try {
            action.EndInvoke(result);
        }
        catch (Exception ex) { // Exception is caught here
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
    }

    static void BeginCheckExc() {
        Thread.Sleep(3000); // Simulate long operation
        throw new Exception("Oops! Something broke!");
    }

    static void EndCheckExc(IAsyncResult result) {
        Console.WriteLine("Done");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

The output you'll see is something like:

Done.

Oops! Something broke!

Press any key to continue...

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As others have said, "because its in a different thread". Or to put it another way, why should the first thread get bothered because a different thread has suffered an exception?

If you use BackgroundWorker then exceptions get passed out in the arguments to the RunWorkerCompleted event (when the thread finishes) - so that might make it easier, depending on your situation.

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If you are interested in catching unhandled excptions from all your threads, you can add an application wide unhandled exception handler. Have a look at the documentation for Application.ThreadException & AppDomain.UnhandledException

Essentially, the code you need to handle this is:

Application.ThreadException += new ThreadExceptionEventHandler(ThreadExceptionFunction);
Application.SetUnhandledExceptionMode(UnhandledExceptionMode.CatchException);
AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += new UnhandledExceptionEventHandler(UnhandledExceptionFunction);

public static void ThreadExceptionFunction(object sender, ThreadExceptionEventArgs args)
{
     // Handle the exception.          
}

public static void UnhandledExceptionFunction(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs args)
{
     // Handle the exception. 
}

Keep in mind that after the exception, your application may be in a corrupt state, so it is best to exit ASAP after logging the error.

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