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When making HTTPS connections to a broken server you can run into trouble since the default behavior of Android is to throw SSLException in the first place.

So, I'm wondering is there a standard security prompt dialog that asks user to take an action on invalid certificate like the one WebView has (with 'Continue', 'View certificate' and 'Cancel' options)?

For example BlackBerry shows such dialog automatically and waits for an action on behalf of a user before raising error. Can I do the same thing in Android?

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2 Answers 2

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I suppose there's no such thing - browsers use custom dialogs and do not expose it to third-party apps. At least I couldn't find any mentions of the desired behavior. BTW, iOS behaves exactly like Android.

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There is no standard dialog as such, and in fact the default behaviour of HttpClient will be to only accept certificates that are part of the android trusted certificate store.

You can do this by building your own trust manager that you then associate with your HttpClient instance. This would look something like this:

public class PromptUserTrustManager implements X509TrustManager
{
    private AcceptUserSelectedCertsTrustManager(ValidateCertificateCallback callback) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, KeyStoreException
    {
        KeyStore keyStore = null;
        TrustManagerFactory factory = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance(TrustManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());
        factory.init(keyStore);
        TrustManager [] trustmanagers = factory.getTrustManagers();
        m_standardTrustManager = (X509TrustManager) trustmanagers[0];
    }

    @Override
    public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] arg0, String arg1) throws CertificateException
    {
    }

    // This is where you check the server cert and make the determination
    @Override
    public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] certChain, String authType)throws CertificateException
    {
        try
        {
            m_standardTrustManager.checkServerTrusted(certChain,authType);
        }
        catch(CertificateException e)
        {
            // Cert isn't trusted - popup the error here. You'll need to 
            // make sure you switch to the UI thread since here you're on a network thread
            if(!userAcceptsCert(certChain))
            {
                throw e;
            }
        }
    }
}

So essentially what you do is in the checkServerTrusted callback you ask the platform whether it trusts the cert. If it doesn't then the call to the trust manager throws the exception. You can then prompt the user what they want to do.

The same thing can be done in WebView using onReceivedSslError() at which point you can display an equivalent warning allowing the user to proceed if they wish.

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