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If I recall correctly that when I used yield inside using SqlConnection blocks I got runtime exceptions.

using (var connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
{
    var command = new SqlCommand(queryString, connection);
    connection.Open();

    SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();

    // Call Read before accessing data.
    while (reader.Read())
    {
        yield reader[0];
    }

    // Call Close when done reading.
    reader.Close();
}

Those problems were solved when I replaced yield by a List where I added items each iteration.

The same problem didn't happen yet to me when inside using StreamReader blocks

using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(fileName))
{
    string line;
    while ((line = streamReader.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
        yield return line;
    }
}

Is there any explanation why Exceptions happened in the former case and not in the latter? Is this construction advisable?

EDIT To get the error (early disposal) that I did in the past you should call the first method below:

IEnumerable<string> Read(string fileName)
{
    using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(fileName))
    {
        return Read(streamReader);
    } // Dispose will be executed before ReadLine() because of deffered execution
}

IEnumerable<string> Read(StreamReader streamReader)
{
    string line;
    while ((line = streamReader.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
        yield return line;
    }
}

The same error can be achieved with other ways of deferring execution, such as System.Linq.Enumerable.Select()

share|improve this question
3  
What exception do you get from the sql yield? –  rossisdead Apr 19 '11 at 12:31
    
If you have reflector, have a look at the code that is produced by both code samples. I should shed light on why one throws and one doesn't. –  Matt Ellen Apr 19 '11 at 12:32
    
@rossisdead As pointed out by LukeH one possible exception is a TimeoutException –  Jader Dias Apr 19 '11 at 12:38
    
@rossisdead As jamietre noted the problem wasn't when I wrote the code as in the question, the problem appeared when I refactored it, as shown in my question edit –  Jader Dias Apr 19 '11 at 12:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See this post for a good explanation of the issues with using and yield. Because you return in enumerator, the using block will already have destroyed the context before anything is accessed. The answers have good solutions, basically, either make the wrapper method an enumerator, or build a list instead.

Also it's usually more practical to have using around the reader, not the connection, and use CommandBehavior.CloseConnection to ensure resources are released when the reader's done. Though it doesn't really matter in your situation, if you ever return a data reader from a method, this will ensure the connection is closed properly when the reader is disposed.

   using(SqlDataReader reader = 
             command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection)) {
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            yield reader[0];
        }
   }
share|improve this answer
    
You're right. yield returns can run into early disposals if the using directive is not in the same method. This is probably the exception I vaguely recalled when I posted this question. –  Jader Dias Apr 19 '11 at 12:47
2  
In this situation I would apply using to both the Reader and the Connection. –  Henk Holterman Apr 19 '11 at 12:56
    
I agree it is best practice, but SQL connections are kind of a special case because it is a normal practice (and supported by CommandBehavior.CloseConnection) to create a data reader and pass it outside the context in which it was created. Dispose on a connection just calls Close (and erases the connection string). So in that sense it's not really necessary to use using around connections, and the way many DB management subsystems are created, it wouldn't be practical. –  Jamie Treworgy Apr 19 '11 at 13:08
1  
As a rule of thumb I should say: Never accept IDisposable parameters in methods that use yield return or other deferring execution methods –  Jader Dias Apr 19 '11 at 13:19

The compiler should handle the yield inside the using block correctly in both cases. There's no obvious reason why it should throw an exception.

One thing to be aware of is that the connection will only be disposed once you've completed iterating and/or manually disposed the enumerator object. If you expose this code in a public method then it's possible that stupid or malicious code could keep your connection open for a long time:

 var enumerable = YourMethodThatYieldsFromTheDataReader();
 var enumerator = enumerable.GetEnumerator();
 enumerator.MoveNext();
 Thread.Sleep(forever);    // your connection will never be disposed
share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense. One possible exception is a TimeoutException. –  Jader Dias Apr 19 '11 at 12:38

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