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I am writing a program to set a sequence in which various objects will appear in report. The sequence is the Y position (cell) on Excel spreadsheet.

A demo part of code is below. What I want to accomplish is to have a collection, which will allow me to add multiple objects and I can get a sorted collection based on the sequence

SortedList list = new SortedList();

Header h = new Header();
h.XPos = 1;
h.name = "Header_1";
list.Add(h.XPos, h);

h = new Header();
h.XPos = 1;
h.name = "Header_2";
list.Add(h.XPos, h);

I know that the SortedList will not allow this and I have been searching for alternate. I don't want to eliminate the duplicates and already tried List<KeyValuePair<int, object>>.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Does the collection need to support inserts / removals after it is given the initial list of members? –  Ani Apr 19 '11 at 12:38
2  
What didn't work when you tried List? –  diceguyd30 Apr 19 '11 at 12:44
    
I dont want just sorting and get the object. But rather I want to get the entire sorted list. So in example below, both the Header objects should exists and in sequence one below other. If I add another Header object with XPos=2, I should then have 3 objects in the list, 2 objects with XPos=1 and third as XPos=2 –  Mayur Kotlikar Apr 20 '11 at 5:00
    
Just a note: when I encounter this type of situation I find that the generic List in combination with the little-known BinarySearch behavior for items not found works wonders. –  J Trana Feb 12 '14 at 4:25

13 Answers 13

Use your own IComparer!

Like already stated in some other answers, you should use your own comparer class. For this sake I use a generic IComparer class, that works with anything that implements IComparable:

/// <summary>
/// Comparer for comparing two keys, handling equality as beeing greater
/// Use this Comparer e.g. with SortedLists or SortedDictionaries, that don't allow duplicate keys
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="TKey"></typeparam>
public class DuplicateKeyComparer<TKey>
                :
             IComparer<TKey> where TKey : IComparable
{
    #region IComparer<TKey> Members

    public int Compare(TKey x, TKey y)
    {
        int result = x.CompareTo(y);

        if (result == 0)
            return 1;   // Handle equality as beeing greater
        else
            return result;
    }

    #endregion
}

You will use it when instancing a new SortedList, SortedDictionary etc:

SortedList<int, MyValueClass> slist = new SortedList<int, MyValueClass>(new DuplicateKeyComparer<int>());

Here int is the key that can be duplicate.

share|improve this answer
5  
But you won't be able to remove any key from it. –  Shashwat Jun 18 '14 at 20:37
1  
Yes thats right, Shachwat! You cannot use Remove(key) or IndexOfKey(key), because the comparer never returns 0 to signal key equality. But you might RemoveAt(index) to delete items if you have their index. –  Knasterbax Jun 23 '14 at 11:19
    
I also encountered the same problem, I used SortedDictionary. It allows removal as well. –  Shashwat Jun 24 '14 at 13:53
    
Note that you are breaking reflexivity of your comparer this way. It can (and will) break things in BCL. –  ghord Jan 12 at 7:49

You can safely use List<> . The List has a Sort method , an overload of which accepts IComparer. You can create your own sorter class as . Here's an example :

private List<Curve> Curves;
this.Curves.Sort(new CurveSorter());

public class CurveSorter : IComparer<Curve>
{
    public int Compare(Curve c1, Curve c2)
    {
        return c2.CreationTime.CompareTo(c1.CreationTime);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I dont want just sorting and get the object. But rather I want to get the entire sorted list. So in example below, both the Header objects should exists and in sequence one below other. If I add another Header object with XPos=2, I should then have 3 objects in the list, 2 objects with XPos=1 and third as XPos=2 –  Mayur Kotlikar Apr 20 '11 at 5:04
1  
all right you mean to say, that the very time an element is inserted in the list, it should be inserted in the correct position as per the sort. Please correct me if wrong. Let me have a look, will get back in short moment –  Dipti Mehta Apr 20 '11 at 5:17
    
Note that List<T>.Sort uses multiple sorting algorithms depending on the collection size and not all of them are stable sorts. So objects added to the collection that compare to equivalent may not appear in the order they were added. –  silent tone Apr 9 '14 at 18:16

Did you try Lookup<TKey, TElement> that will allow duplicate keys http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb460184.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. My problem is the objects will not be only of one type (just not Header), those can vary (lets say Footer,Sidebar etc) but each will have XPos –  Mayur Kotlikar Apr 20 '11 at 5:06
    
Also, there is no public constructor on Lookup I believe. Any good way around this? –  Jeff Bridgman Dec 2 '11 at 22:59
1  
@JeffBridgman you will have to rely on Linq. You can do ToLookup on any IEnumerable<T>. –  nawfal Sep 23 '13 at 20:07
1  
Yes it allows duplicate keys, but it doesn't keep anything sorted! –  romkyns Sep 10 '14 at 18:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks a lot for your help. While searching more, I found this solution. (Available in Stackoverflow.com in other question)

First, I created a class which would encapsulate my objects for classes (Headers,Footer etc)

public class MyPosition
{
    public int Position { get; set; }
    public object MyObjects{ get; set; }
}

So this class is supposed to hold on the objects, and PosX of each object goes as int Position

List<MyPosition> Sequence= new List<MyPosition>();
Sequence.Add(new MyPosition() { Position = 1, Headerobject });
Sequence.Add(new MyPosition() { Position = 2, Headerobject1 });
Sequence.Add(new MyPosition() { Position = 1, Footer });

League.Sort((PosA, PosB) => PosA.Position.CompareTo(PosB.Position));

What eventually I get is the sorted "Sequence" list.

share|improve this answer

I use the following:

public class TupleList<T1, T2> : List<Tuple<T1, T2>> where T1 : IComparable
{
    public void Add(T1 item, T2 item2)
    {
        Add(new Tuple<T1, T2>(item, item2));
    }

    public new void Sort()
    {
        Comparison<Tuple<T1, T2>> c = (a, b) => a.Item1.CompareTo(b.Item1);
        base.Sort(c);
    }

}

My test case:

[TestMethod()]
    public void SortTest()
    {
        TupleList<int, string> list = new TupleList<int, string>();
        list.Add(1, "cat");
        list.Add(1, "car");
        list.Add(2, "dog");
        list.Add(2, "door");
        list.Add(3, "elephant");
        list.Add(1, "coconut");
        list.Add(1, "cab");
        list.Sort();
        foreach(Tuple<int, string> tuple in list)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0}:{1}", tuple.Item1,tuple.Item2));
        }
        int expected_first = 1;
        int expected_last = 3;
        int first = list.First().Item1;  //requires using System.Linq
        int last = list.Last().Item1;    //requires using System.Linq
        Assert.AreEqual(expected_first, first);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected_last, last);
    }

The output:

1:cab
1:coconut
1:car
1:cat
2:door
2:dog
3:elephant
share|improve this answer
    
Tuple is not available in all releases of .NET, but can be substitued with KeyValuePair<K,V> –  Reuben Mar 5 at 3:09

The problem is that you use something as key that isn't a key (cause it occurs multiple times).

So if you have real coordinates you should maybe take the Point as the key for your SortedList.

Or you create a List<List<Header>> where your first list index defines the x-position and the inner list index the y-position (or vice versa if you like).

share|improve this answer
    
A Key may have multiple instances as long as it is not a primary key. At least that's what they told me in the Databases class I took. –  amalgamate Jan 17 '14 at 18:31
    
This answer is a bit short, but it explains the problem properly and provides the correct solution, i.e. using SortedList<int, List<Header>>. This maintains the header sorted and can store many headers at the same xPos. For a code sample look for my answer. I plussed one this answer, since it points in the right direction. Please plus 1 my answer too if you feel it is helpful. –  Peter Huber May 29 at 9:43

Linq.Lookup is cool and all, but if your target is to simply loop over the "keys" while allowing them to be duplicated you can use this structure:

List<KeyValuePair<String, String>> FieldPatterns = new List<KeyValuePair<string, string>>() {
   new KeyValuePair<String,String>("Address","CommonString"),
   new KeyValuePair<String,String>("Username","UsernamePattern"),
   new KeyValuePair<String,String>("Username","CommonString"),
};

Then you can write:

foreach (KeyValuePair<String,String> item in FieldPatterns)
{
   //use item.Key and item.Value
}

HTH

share|improve this answer

The key (pun intended) to this is to create an IComparable-based class that maintains equality and hashing, but never compares to 0 if not equal. This can be done, and can be created with a couple bonuses - stable sorting (that is, values added to the sorted list first will maintain their position), and ToString() can simply return the actual key string value.

Here's a struct key that should do the trick:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace System
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Defined in Totlsoft.Util.
    /// A key that will always be unique but compares
    /// primarily on the Key property, which is not required
    /// to be unique.
    /// </summary>
    public struct StableKey : IComparable<StableKey>, IComparable
    {
        private static long s_Next;
        private long m_Sequence;
        private IComparable m_Key;

        /// <summary>
        /// Defined in Totlsoft.Util.
        /// Constructs a StableKey with the given IComparable key.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="key"></param>
        public StableKey( IComparable key )
        {
            if( null == key )
                throw new ArgumentNullException( "key" );

            m_Sequence = Interlocked.Increment( ref s_Next );
            m_Key = key;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Overridden. True only if internal sequence and the
        /// Key are equal.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="obj"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public override bool Equals( object obj )
        {
            if( !( obj is StableKey ) )
                return false;

            var dk = (StableKey)obj;

            return m_Sequence.Equals( dk.m_Sequence ) &&
                Key.Equals( dk.Key );
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Overridden. Gets the hash code of the internal
        /// sequence and the Key.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return m_Sequence.GetHashCode() ^ Key.GetHashCode();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Overridden. Returns Key.ToString().
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public override string ToString()
        {
            return Key.ToString();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The key that will be compared on.
        /// </summary>
        public IComparable Key
        {
            get
            {
                if( null == m_Key )
                    return 0;

                return m_Key;
            }
        }

        #region IComparable<StableKey> Members

        /// <summary>
        /// Compares this Key property to another. If they
        /// are the same, compares the incremented value.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="other"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public int CompareTo( StableKey other )
        {
            var cmp = Key.CompareTo( other.Key );
            if( cmp == 0 )
                cmp = m_Sequence.CompareTo( other.m_Sequence );

            return cmp;
        }

        #endregion

        #region IComparable Members

        int IComparable.CompareTo( object obj )
        {
            return CompareTo( (StableKey)obj );
        }

        #endregion
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a nice idea. I wrapped the concept into a custom ICollection. See stackoverflow.com/a/21625939/158285 –  bradgonesurfing Feb 7 '14 at 11:00

The problem is that the data structure design doesn't match the requirements: It is necessary to store several Headers for the same XPos. Therefore, SortedList<XPos, value> should not have a value of Header, but a value of List<Header>. It's a simple and small change, but it solves all problems and avoids creating new problems like other suggested solutions (see explanation below):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace TrySortedList {
  class Program {

    class Header {
      public int XPos;
      public string Name;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args) {
      SortedList<int, List<Header>> sortedHeaders = new SortedList<int,List<Header>>();
      add(sortedHeaders, 1, "Header_1");
      add(sortedHeaders, 1, "Header_2");
      add(sortedHeaders, 2, "Header_3");
      foreach (var headersKvp in sortedHeaders) {
        foreach (Header header in headersKvp.Value) {
          Console.WriteLine(header.XPos + ": " + header.Name);
        }
      }
    }

    private static void add(SortedList<int, List<Header>> sortedHeaders, int xPos, string name) {
      List<Header> headers;
      if (!sortedHeaders.TryGetValue(xPos, out headers)){
        headers = new List<Header>();
        sortedHeaders[xPos] = headers;
      }
      headers.Add(new Header { XPos = xPos, Name = name });
    }
  }
}

Output:
1: Header_1
1: Header_2
2: Header_3

Please note that adding a "funny" key, like adding a random number or pretending that 2 XPos with the same value are different lead to many other problems. For example it becomes difficult or even impossible to remove a particular Header.

Also note that the sorting performance is much better if only few List<Header> have to be sorted than every Header. Example: If there are 100 XPos and each has 100 headers, 10000 Header need to be sorted as opposed to 100 List<Header>.

Of course, also this solution has a disadvantage: If there are many XPos with only 1 Header, as many Lists need to be created, which is some overhead.

share|improve this answer

Create a class and query the list:

Public Class SortingAlgorithm
{
    public int ID {get; set;}
    public string name {get; set;}
    public string address1 {get; set;}
    public string city {get; set;}
    public string state {get; set;}
    public int age {get; set;}
}

//declare a sorting algorithm list
List<SortingAlgorithm> sortAlg = new List<SortingAlgorithm>();

//Add multiple values to the list
sortAlg.Add( new SortingAlgorithm() {ID = ID, name = name, address1 = address1, city = city, state = state, age = age});
sortAlg.Add( new SortingAlgorithm() {ID = ID, name = name, address1 = address1, city = city, state = state, age = age});
sortAlg.Add( new SortingAlgorithm() {ID = ID, name = name, address1 = address1, city = city, state = state, age = age});

//query and order by the list
  var sortedlist = (from s in sortAlg
                    select new { s.ID, s.name, s.address1, s.city, s.state, s.age })
                                                     .OrderBy(r => r.ID)
                                                     .ThenBy(r=> r.name)
                                                     .ThenBy(r=> r.city)
                                                     .ThenBy(r=>r.state)
                                                     .ThenBy(r=>r.age);
share|improve this answer

You can use the SortedList, use your value for the TKey, and int (count) for the TValue.

Here's a sample: A function that sorts the letters of a word.

    private string sortLetters(string word)
    {
        var input = new System.Collections.Generic.SortedList<char, int>();

        foreach (var c in word.ToCharArray())
        {
            if (input.ContainsKey(c))
                input[c]++;
            else
                input.Add(c, 1);
        }

        var output = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (var kvp in input)
        {
            output.Append(kvp.Key, kvp.Value);
        }

        string s;

        return output.ToString();

    }
share|improve this answer

The trick is to augment your object with a unique key. See the following test which passes. I want to keep my points sorted by their X value. Just using a naked Point2D in my comparison function will cause points with the same X value to be eliminated. So I wrap the Point2D in a tagging class called Indexed.

[Fact]
public void ShouldBeAbleToUseCustomComparatorWithSortedSet()
{
    // Create comparer that compares on X value but when X
    // X values are uses the index
    var comparer = new 
        System.Linq.Comparer<Indexed<Point2D>>(( p0, p1 ) =>
        {
            var r = p0.Value.X.CompareTo(p1.Value.X);
            return r == 0 ? p0.Index.CompareTo(p1.Index) : r;
        });

    // Sort points according to X
    var set = new SortedSet<Indexed<Point2D>>(comparer);

    int i=0;

    // Create a helper function to wrap each point in a unique index
    Action<Point2D> index = p =>
    {
        var ip = Indexed.Create(i++, p);
        set.Add(ip);
    };

    index(new Point2D(9,10));
    index(new Point2D(1,25));
    index(new Point2D(11,-10));
    index(new Point2D(2,99));
    index(new Point2D(5,55));
    index(new Point2D(5,23));
    index(new Point2D(11,11));
    index(new Point2D(21,12));
    index(new Point2D(-1,76));
    index(new Point2D(16,21));
    set.Count.Should()
       .Be(10);
    var xs = set.Select(p=>p.Value.X).ToList();
    xs.Should()
      .BeInAscendingOrder();
    xs.ShouldBeEquivalentTo(new[]{-1,1,2,5,5,9,11,11,16,21});

}

Utilities to make this work are

A comparer that takes a lambda

public class Comparer<T> : IComparer<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T, T, int> _comparer;

    public Comparer(Func<T, T, int> comparer)
    {
        if (comparer == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("comparer");
        _comparer = comparer;
    }

    public int Compare(T x, T y)
    {
        return _comparer(x, y);
    }
}

A tagging struct

public struct Indexed<T>
{
    public int Index { get; private set; }
    public T Value { get; private set; }
    public Indexed(int index, T value) : this()
    {
        Index = index;
        Value = value;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "(Indexed: " + Index + ", " + Value.ToString () + " )";
    }
}

public class Indexed
{
    public static Indexed<T> Create<T>(int indexed, T value)
    {
        return new Indexed<T>(indexed, value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
See my other answer for a complete wrap of the above concepts into a custom ICollection class –  bradgonesurfing Feb 7 '14 at 10:59

This collection class will maintain duplicates and insert sort order for the duplicate. The trick is to tag the items with a unique value as they are inserted to maintain a stable sort order. Then we wrap it all up in an ICollection interface.

public class SuperSortedSet<TValue> : ICollection<TValue>
{
    private readonly SortedSet<Indexed<TValue>> _Container;
    private int _Index = 0;
    private IComparer<TValue> _Comparer;

    public SuperSortedSet(IComparer<TValue> comparer)
    {
        _Comparer = comparer;
        var c2 = new System.Linq.Comparer<Indexed<TValue>>((p0, p1) =>
        {
            var r = _Comparer.Compare(p0.Value, p1.Value);
            if (r == 0)
            {
                if (p0.Index == -1
                    || p1.Index == -1)
                    return 0;

                return p0.Index.CompareTo(p1.Index);

            }
            else return r;
        });
        _Container = new SortedSet<Indexed<TValue>>(c2);
    } 

    public IEnumerator<TValue> GetEnumerator() { return _Container.Select(p => p.Value).GetEnumerator(); }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() { return GetEnumerator(); }

    public void Add(TValue item) { _Container.Add(Indexed.Create(_Index++, item)); }

    public void Clear() { _Container.Clear();}

    public bool Contains(TValue item) { return _Container.Contains(Indexed.Create(-1,item)); }

    public void CopyTo(TValue[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        foreach (var value in this)
        {
            if (arrayIndex >= array.Length)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Not enough space in array");
            }
            array[arrayIndex] = value;
            arrayIndex++;
        }
    }

    public bool Remove(TValue item) { return _Container.Remove(Indexed.Create(-1, item)); }

    public int Count {
        get { return _Container.Count; }
    }
    public bool IsReadOnly {
        get { return false; }
    }
}

a test class

[Fact]
public void ShouldWorkWithSuperSortedSet()
{
    // Sort points according to X
    var set = new SuperSortedSet<Point2D>
        (new System.Linq.Comparer<Point2D>((p0, p1) => p0.X.CompareTo(p1.X)));

    set.Add(new Point2D(9,10));
    set.Add(new Point2D(1,25));
    set.Add(new Point2D(11,-10));
    set.Add(new Point2D(2,99));
    set.Add(new Point2D(5,55));
    set.Add(new Point2D(5,23));
    set.Add(new Point2D(11,11));
    set.Add(new Point2D(21,12));
    set.Add(new Point2D(-1,76));
    set.Add(new Point2D(16,21));

    var xs = set.Select(p=>p.X).ToList();
    xs.Should().BeInAscendingOrder();
    xs.Count.Should()
       .Be(10);
    xs.ShouldBeEquivalentTo(new[]{-1,1,2,5,5,9,11,11,16,21});

    set.Remove(new Point2D(5,55));
    xs = set.Select(p=>p.X).ToList();
    xs.Count.Should()
       .Be(9);
    xs.ShouldBeEquivalentTo(new[]{-1,1,2,5,9,11,11,16,21});

    set.Remove(new Point2D(5,23));
    xs = set.Select(p=>p.X).ToList();
    xs.Count.Should()
       .Be(8);
    xs.ShouldBeEquivalentTo(new[]{-1,1,2,9,11,11,16,21});

    set.Contains(new Point2D(11, 11))
       .Should()
       .BeTrue();

    set.Contains(new Point2D(-1, 76))
        .Should().BeTrue();

    // Note that the custom compartor function ignores the Y value
    set.Contains(new Point2D(-1, 66))
        .Should().BeTrue();

    set.Contains(new Point2D(27, 66))
        .Should().BeFalse();

}

The tagging struct

public struct Indexed<T>
{
    public int Index { get; private set; }
    public T Value { get; private set; }
    public Indexed(int index, T value) : this()
    {
        Index = index;
        Value = value;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "(Indexed: " + Index + ", " + Value.ToString () + " )";
    }
}

public class Indexed
{
    public static Indexed<T> Create<T>(int indexed, T value)
    {
        return new Indexed<T>(indexed, value);
    }
}

The lambda comparer helper

public class Comparer<T> : IComparer<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T, T, int> _comparer;

    public Comparer(Func<T, T, int> comparer)
    {
        if (comparer == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("comparer");
        _comparer = comparer;
    }

    public int Compare(T x, T y)
    {
        return _comparer(x, y);
    }
}
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