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I have started testing protobuf-net for serialization. I had seen benchmarks (http://www.servicestack.net/benchmarks/NorthwindDatabaseRowsSerialization.100000-times.2010-08-17.html) which suggested faster serialization and smaller files.

I am really seeing a huge difference in the size of the produced files. However, the speed I am seeing is within 5% of WCF's DataContractSerializer.

That left me wondering if I am doing something wrong?

Here is my tests's code:

private static void ProtoBufSerializer(IQueryable<DataRow> details)
    {
        List<DataRow> list = details.ToList();

        using (var file = File.Create("protobuf2.bin"))
        {                
            Serializer.Serialize<List<DataRow>>(file, list);
        }
    }

    private static void DataContractSerializer(IQueryable<DataRow> details)
    {
        DataContractSerializer serializer = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(List<DataRow>));
        List<DataRow> list = details.ToList();

        using (FileStream fileStream = new FileStream("testSerializationDataContract.xml", FileMode.Create))
        {
            serializer.WriteObject(fileStream, list);
        }            
    }

[ProtoContract]
public class DataRow
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public DRFDataRow DrfDataRow;

    [ProtoMember(2)]
    public Guid guid;
}

[ProtoContract]
public class DRFDataRow : FixedWidthRow
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public int CompanyNumber { get; set; }

    // several fields abreviated for brevety
}

[ProtoContract, ProtoInclude(100, "DRFDataRow")]
public abstract class FixedWidthRow : IProviderRow
{
    // several fields abreviated for brevety

There are about 73k items in my List. Each item isn't too big, altough there are a lot of fields in DRFDataRow (about 50).

P.S.: I am not complaining, I am very happy with the results since the serialized results size is so much smaller, I am just wondering if I can also reproduce the speed gains I have seen on benchmarks.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In that example it isn't entirely clear where the timing starts and ends - for example, if you are including the time to fetch data from the IQueryable[<T>] then that will most likely be a bottle-neck. The contracts look fine; there are some small optimisations possible if you like, but nothing major (although using group-based sub-objects should help a bit by avoiding some buffering; add DataFormat=DataFormat.Group to the sub-object [ProtoMember(... {here})] and [ProtoInclude(... {here})]).

If the issue isn't the IQueryable[<T>], then it may well be worth trying v2 (currently available as an alpha, or as source) which completely overhauls the internals.

For a more detailed answer, I'd need a fully reproducible example to investigate.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, the bottleneck of course is fetching the data which account almost all of the time. The timing starts before the method is called. I changed the method to take an already fetched list and time only the serialization and the results are great. 2.02 seconds to serialize with DataContractSerializer and 0.83 seconds to serialize with protobuf-net. I really don't think I will need to optimize over these results even when using the actual data (this was over test data which is smaller). – Gilles Apr 19 '11 at 14:43

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