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Possible Duplicate:
To get parent class using Reflection on C#

I am trying to find an easy way of getting the inheritance tree of a certain type using reflection in C#.

Let's say that I have the following classes;

public class A
{ }

public class B : A
{ }

public class C : B
{ }

How do I use reflection upon type 'C' to determine that its superclass is 'B', who in turn comes from 'A' and so on? I know that I can use 'IsSubclassOf()', but let's assume that I don't know the superclass that I am looking for.

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marked as duplicate by Matt Ellen, AakashM, Grant Thomas, George Stocker, A.R. Apr 19 '11 at 13:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Possible Dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/1524562/… –  Brook Apr 19 '11 at 13:14
    
related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/5601486/… –  Matt Ellen Apr 19 '11 at 13:19
    
oh yeah, this is a dupe alright. Guess I should have used 'parent' instead of 'superclass –  A.R. Apr 19 '11 at 13:35
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

To get a type's immediate parent, you can use the Type.BaseType property. You can iteratively call BaseType until it returns null to walk up a type's inheritance hierarchy.

For example:

public static IEnumerable<Type> GetInheritancHierarchy
    (this Type type)
{
    for (var current = type; current != null; current = current.BaseType)
        yield return current;
}

Do note that it isn't valid to use System.Object as the end-point because not all types (for example, interface types) inherit from it.

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An object of type System.Type has a property named BaseType which returns "the type from which the current System.Type directly inherits." You can walk up this chain of BaseTypes until you get null, at which point you know you have reached System.Object.

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