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I have the following example paragraph:

The following is my text. My introductory line of text is the this, that and the other. My second line is much the same as before but completely different. Don't even talk about my third line of text.

I would like the capture the following sentence using regular expressions:

My introductory line of text is the this, that and the other.

The code I have thus fare is:

(\bMy\sintroductory\sline\sof\stext).*(\.)

But this gets all the text. How would I capture until the first fullstop only?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Notice the difference:

(\bMy\sintroductory\sline\sof\stext)[^\.]*\.

Just for the very curious here's some benchmarking code for my approach and Piskvor's.

Character class approach: ~550ms on my machine through Firefox.

var start = (new Date()).getTime();
for(var i=0;i<100000;i++){
"The following is my text. My introductory line of text is the this, that and the other. My second line is much the same as before but completely different. Don't even talk about my third line of text.".match(/(\bMy\sintroductory\sline\sof\stext)[^\.]*\./);
}
var stop = (new Date()).getTime();
alert(stop - start);

Non-greedy approach: ~650ms on my machine through Firefox.

var start = (new Date()).getTime();
for(var i=0;i<100000;i++){
"The following is my text. My introductory line of text is the this, that and the other. My second line is much the same as before but completely different. Don't even talk about my third line of text.".match(/(\bMy\sintroductory\sline\sof\stext).*?\./);
}
var stop = (new Date()).getTime();
alert(stop - start);

If you can, and want to, leave a comment with your times. Thanks!

Please don't post opinions about micro-optimization. I'm just curious ;).

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I get similar results to you. Seems the character class approach is slightly faster. Thanks both for the thorough answers! Really appreciate it –  iali Apr 20 '11 at 11:35
(\bMy\sintroductory\sline\sof\stext).*?\.

That makes the * "ungreedy" and it will match as few characters as possible.

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It would be interesting to find out which approach is faster. –  Alin Purcaru Apr 19 '11 at 17:46
    
@Alin Purcaru: I'd think yours, as it's only interested in the current character. I see that your benchmark seems to confirm. –  Piskvor Apr 19 '11 at 18:04
    
Thanks for this - worked great –  iali Apr 20 '11 at 11:34

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