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If I want to merge into a Git branch the changes made only to some of the files changed in a particular commit which includes changes to multiple files, how can this be achieved?

Suppose the Git commit called stuff has changes to files A, B, C, and D but I want to merge only stuff's changes to files A and B. It sounds like a job for git cherry-pick but cherry-pick only knows how to merge entire commits, not a subset of the files.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 85 down vote accepted

I'd do it with cherry-pick -n (--no-commit) which lets you inspect (and modify) the result before committing:

git cherry-pick -n <commit>

# unstage modifications you don't want to keep, and remove the
# modifications from the work tree as well.
# this does work recursively!
git checkout HEAD <path>

# commit; the message will have been stored for you by cherry-pick
git commit

If the vast majority of modifications are things you don't want, instead of checking out individual paths (the middle step), you could reset everything back, then add in what you want:

# unstage everything
git reset HEAD

# stage the modifications you do want
git add <path>

# make the work tree match the index
# (do this from the top level of the repo)
git checkout .
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3  
@Daniel -n is a synonym for --no-commit (look at the man page) - they do exactly the same thing, exercising the same code path. If you really saw a difference between them, it was something else you did. (I don't know what you mean by it "merging", though - cherry-pick never merges. It applies changes on top of what you already have, then commits unless you use this option.) –  Jefromi May 7 '13 at 15:16

Perhaps the advantage of this method over Jefromi's answer is that you don't have to remember which behaviour of git reset is the right one :)

 # Create a branch to throw away, on which we'll do the cherry-pick:
 git checkout -b to-discard

 # Do the cherry-pick:
 git cherry-pick stuff

 # Switch back to the branch you were previously on:
 git checkout -

 # Update the working tree and the index with the versions of A and B
 # from the to-discard branch:
 git checkout to-discard -- A B

 # Commit those changes:
 git commit -m "Cherry-picked changes to A and B from [stuff]"

 # Delete the temporary branch:
 git branch -D to-discard
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1  
thanks for your answer. Now that inspired me to think, why not skip the cherry-pick and directly use git checkout stuff -- A B? And with git commit -C stuff the commit message would remain the same as well –  Tobias Kienzler Apr 19 '11 at 14:21
5  
@Tobias: That would work only if the files modified on stuff have not been modified on your current branch or anywhere between the common ancestor of HEAD and stuff and the tip of stuff. If they have, then cherry-pick creates the correct result (essentially the result of a merge), while your method would throw away the changes in the current branch, and keep all of the changes from the common ancestor up to stuff - not just the ones in that single commit. –  Jefromi Apr 19 '11 at 14:32
2  
@Tobias Kienzler: I was assuming that your starting point was sufficiently different from the parent of stuff that the result of the cherry pick would leave A and B with different content from their content in the commit stuff. However, if it would just be the same, you're right - you could just do as you say. –  Mark Longair Apr 19 '11 at 14:34
    
@Jefromi: sorry, crossed in the post... –  Mark Longair Apr 19 '11 at 14:37
    
@Jeromi, @Mark: thanks for your feedback, in my case I'm treating branches with entirely disjunct files which led me to my suggestion. But indeed I'd had run into trouble with it sooner or later, so thank you for bringing this up –  Tobias Kienzler Apr 19 '11 at 14:47

Cherry pick is to pick changes from a specific "commit". The simplest solution is to pick all changes of certain files is to use

 git checkout source_branch <paths>...

In example:

$ git branch
* master
  twitter_integration
$ git checkout twitter_integration app/models/avatar.rb db/migrate/20090223104419_create_avatars.rb test/unit/models/avatar_test.rb test/functional/models/avatar_test.rb
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   new file:   app/models/avatar.rb
#   new file:   db/migrate/20090223104419_create_avatars.rb
#   new file:   test/functional/models/avatar_test.rb
#   new file:   test/unit/models/avatar_test.rb
#
$ git commit -m "'Merge' avatar code from 'twitter_integration' branch"
[master]: created 4d3e37b: "'Merge' avatar code from 'twitter_integration' branch"
4 files changed, 72 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
create mode 100644 app/models/avatar.rb
create mode 100644 db/migrate/20090223104419_create_avatars.rb
create mode 100644 test/functional/models/avatar_test.rb
create mode 100644 test/unit/models/avatar_test.rb

Sources and full explanation http://jasonrudolph.com/blog/2009/02/25/git-tip-how-to-merge-specific-files-from-another-branch/

UPDATE:

With this method, git will not MERGE the file, it will just override any other change done on the destination branch. You will need to merge the changes manually:

$ git diff HEAD filename

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2  
I thought so too, but this fails horribly if the files have changed on both branches since it discards the changes of your current branch –  Tobias Kienzler Dec 4 '13 at 13:24
    
You are right, it is a must to clarify that this way git doesn't MERGE, it just override. You can then do "git diff HEAD filename" to see what changed and do the merge manually. –  cminatti Dec 18 '13 at 14:12

I would just cherry-pick everything, then do this:

git reset --soft HEAD^

Then I would revert the changes I don't want, then make a new commit.

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