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I'm having a problem with

foreach(var category in categories)
{
    foreach(var word in words)
    {
        var waitCallback = new WaitCallback(state =>
        {
            DoSomething(word, category);
        });

        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(waitCallback);
    }
}

When the DoSomething gets executed, it receives the latest value for each captured variable instead of the value I desired. I can imagine a solution for this, but it imagine you guys can come up with better solutions

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possible duplicate of How does a lambda in C# bind to the enumerator in a foreach? –  JSBձոգչ Apr 19 '11 at 13:36
1  
I don't agree that it's a duplicate. That post asks why the behavior happens; this post asks what the best way to write this code to avoid the problem is. –  mquander Apr 19 '11 at 13:47
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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The canonical way to solve this is to copy the values into temporary variables which are declared inside the loop.

foreach(var category in categories)
{
    var catCopy = category;
    foreach(var word in words)
    {
        var wordCopy = word;
        var waitCallback = new WaitCallback(state =>
        {
            DoSomething(wordCopy, catCopy);
        });

        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(waitCallback);
    }
}
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Excellent thanks. Have been scratching my head on this one for about an hour. So each loop instantiates a new local variable, each of which is captured independently of the others - got it. –  locster Nov 5 '11 at 15:48
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Refactor it to:

foreach(var category in categories) {
  foreach(var word in words) {
    DoSomethingAsync(word, category);
  }
}

...

private void DoSomethingAsync(string word, string category) {
  var waitCallback = new WaitCallback(state => DoSomething(word, category));
  ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(waitCallback);
}

This is simple and easy to understand. It states the developer's intent without cluttering the code with extra variables (as in the default way to solve this problem).

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1  
I think this is three times better than the accepted answer. –  mquander Apr 19 '11 at 13:58
    
@mquander: Might be a matter of taste, but it's basically the same principle. In the case of the function, the copy is made implicitly through the function parameters. –  Heinzi Oct 31 '12 at 21:42
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I would write the whole thing like this, which dodges the problem and leaves absolutely no question about what is going on:

var callbacks = words.SelectMany(w => categories.Select(c =>
    new WaitCallback(state => {
        DoSomething(w, c);
    })
));

foreach (var callback in callbacks)
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(callback);
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For reference, I imagine the following would solve my problem:

foreach(var category in categories)
{
    foreach(var word in words)
    {
        var waitCallback = new WaitCallback(state =>
        {
            var kv = (KeyValuePair<string, string>)state;
            DoSomething(kv.Key, kv.Value);
        });

        var state2 = new KeyValuePair<string, string>(word, category);
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(waitCallback, state2);
    }
}
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1  
Yes, you can also use a Tuple<string, string> instead of the KeyValuePair. –  Henk Holterman Apr 19 '11 at 13:38
    
@Henk which requires .NET 4.0 –  Jader Dias Apr 19 '11 at 13:43
1  
which I now consider the default: unless stated otherwise. –  Henk Holterman Apr 19 '11 at 13:47
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